Category Archives: Molecular Biology

The proteasome branches out

The surface of a protein is not at all like a ball of yarn, even though they are both one long string. This has profound implications for the immune system. Look at any solved protein structure. The backbone bobs and weaves taking water hating (hydrophobic) amino acids into the center of the protein, and putting water loving (hydrophilic) amino acids on the surface. So even though the peptide backbone is continuous, only discontinuous patches of it are displayed on the protein surface.

Which is a big problem for the immune system which wants to recognize the surface of the protein (which is all it first gets to see with an invading bug). Now we know that foreign proteins are ingested by the cell, chopped up by the proteasome, and fragments loaded on to immune molecules (class I Major Histocompatibility Complex antigens) and displayed on the cell surface so the immune system can learn what it looks like and react to it. The peptides aren’t very long — under 11 or so amino acids, but they are continuous.

What if the really distinct part of the protein surface (e.g. the immunogen)  is made of two distinct patches from the backbone? A fascinating paper shows how the immune system might still recognize it. Chop the protein up into fragments by the proteasome, and then have the fragments from adjacent patches put back together. You know that any enzyme can be run in reverse, so if the proteasome can split peptide bonds apart it can also join them together.

This is exactly what was found in a recent paper — Science vol. 354 pp. 354 – 358 ’16. The small peptides (containing at most 11 amino acids) finding their way to the cell surface were analyzed in a technical tour de force. In aggregate they go by the fancy name of immunopeptidome. They found that the proteasome IS actually splicing peptide fragments together. This is called Proteasome Catalyzed Peptide Splicing (PCPS). The present work shows that it accounts for 1/3 of the class I immunopeptidome in terms of diversity and 1/4 in terms of abundance. One-third of self antigens are represented on the cell surface of the immune cell line they studied (GR-LCL the GR-lymphoblastoid cell line) ONLY by spliced peptides. The ordering of the spliced peptide was the same as the parent protein in only half. There was no preference for the length of the protein skipped by the splice.

The work has huge implications for immunology, not least autoimmune disease.

So today I wrote the author the following

Dr. Mishto

Terrific paper ! Do you have any evidence for the spliced peptides being spatially contiguous on the surface of the parent protein. Have you looked?

This makes a lot of sense, because the immune system should ‘want’ to recognize protein conformations as they exist in the living cell, rather than stretches of amino acid sequence in the parent protein. Also, with few exceptions the surface of a given protein in vivo is a collection of discontinuous peptide sequences of the parent protein. I’ve always wondered how the immune system did this, and perhaps your paper explains things.


and got this back almost immediately

Dear Luysii

Interesting idea. We shall have a look for few examples where the crystallography structure or the parental protein is disclosed already.



It doesn’t get any better than this. Tomorrow I will be exactly 78 years and 6 months old. It shows I can still think (on occasion).

The butterfly effect in embryology

How the snake lost its legs. No, this isn’t a Just So story a la Rudyard Kipling, but a fascinating paper in Cell (vol. 167 pp. 598 – 600, 633 – 642 ’16 ). All it takes is a 17 nucleotide deletion in ZRS (Zone of polarizing activity Regulatory Sequence), an enhancer of gene expression involved in limb development. The enhancer is at least 1,300 nucleotides long (but I can’t find out just how long ZRS is). The deletion removes a binding site for a transcription factor (ETS) which turns on some limb development genes.

ZRS has long been known to be involved in limb development, and mutations distributed over 700 nucleotides are associated with a variety of human limb malformations. So the authors sequenced the enhancer in a variety of species (including many snakes) and found that only snakes had the deletion.

Then they put the snake ZRS into genetically engineered transgenic mice and found markedly shortened limbs. That was all it took. Reintroducing the missing 17 nucleotides into the transgenics restores normal limb development. Staggering what genetic technology is capable of.

Where does the butterfly effect come in? Because the enhancer is 1,000,000 nucleotides away from some of the genes it controls. If you were studying sequences around the genes it controls, you’d never find the deletion (until you’d run through a large number of grad students). Human biology (with limb malformations) told the authors where to look.

Straightened out 1,000,000 nucleotides is 3,200,000 Angstroms,or 320 microns (32 times the size of the average 10 micron nucleus). Remarkable how it finds its target. You might be interested in a series of posts which try to imagine these goings on at human scale — blowing up the nucleus so it fits in a football stadium with our double stranded DNA blown up to the size of linguini with a total total length of 2840 miles. Start here –

The world’s longest allosteric effect

I think there is some very interesting protein physical chemistry to be discovered/worked out based on a recent report [ Nature vol. 537 pp. 107 – 111 ’16 ]. It involves a long (2,200 Angstrom) coiled coil protein called EEA1 (Early Endosome Antigen 1). It contains 1,400 amino acids 1,275 of which form a coiled coil.

If you are conversant with the alpha helix and how two of them form a coiled coil, jump to ****. Otherwise here is some background and links to pictures which should help.

The alpha helix is a type of protein secondary structure in which the protein backbone assumes the shape of a coiled spring. There are 3.64 amino acids per turn. A single turn is 5.4 Angstroms high and 11 Angstroms wide. The alpha helix is right handed. That is to say, that if you orient the chain so that your thumb points from the N terminal to C terminal amino acid, the chain will twist in the direction of the fingers of the right hand as it rises. For some reason I can’t provide a link to a very large number of images for you hit. However, when I go to Google and type images of alpha helices you see them immediately — you’ll have to do the same to get there.

Coiled coils have two alpha helices winding around each other. This means that for secure interactions, the same types of amino acids must repeat again and again. A 7 residue periodicity (abcdefg)n in the distribution of nonpolar and charged amino acid residues is a feature characteristic of proteins which form alpha helices coiled about each other (coiled coil molecules). The 7 amino acids are lettered a – g from amino to carboxy. Positions a and d are usually hydrophobic amino acids (Leu, Ile, Val, Ala), positions e and g are usually polar or charged. The nonpolar a and d side chains associate by means of complementary knobs into holes packing. Each individual alpha helix is right handed, but the two helices wind around each other with a left handed turn. There are 3.64 amino acids per turn of an alpha helix, so for a regular repeating structure an amino acid should appear at the same position in space on the alpha helix (which forms a rigid rod). To see all the pictures you want — go to Google and type “Images of the Alpha Helix”.

To get the number of amino acids down so there are 3.5 per/turn (so the structure can repeat exactly every 7 amino acids –e.g. after 2 alpha helical turns) left handed supercoiling of each helix occurs (it’s a chicken and the egg situation). The helices are at an angle of 18 degrees to each other, and every 3.5 amino acids still form a 5.4 Angstrom (when one helix is viewed in isolation), but due to the tilt, they take up 5.1 Angstroms. This means that the same type of amino acid is found at positions 1, 8, 15, 22 etc. All intermediate filament proteins (keratin, neurofilaments, vimentin, etc.) contain a coiled coil structure. So to see all the pictures you could want — go to Google and type “Images of coiled coil proteins”

So the 1,275 amino acids of EEA1 divided by 3.5 and multiplied by 5.1 give you a coiled coil of fairly enormous length for a protein (1,858 Angstroms) — average protein diameter (if there is such a thing) is under 50 Angstroms

Functionally, EEA1 seems to be used as a tether with one end free and the other end hooked to a target membrane which wants to ‘catch’ the early endosome. The target membrane isn’t specified in the paper. Apparently EEA1 when not binding the endosome, is in a fully extended state, at around 2,000 Angstroms.

A protein called Rab5 is found on the early endosome membrane, and when EEA1 contacts it, the long coiled coil helix collapses, dragging the endosome toward the target membrane.  This is entropy in action, there being far more configurations of a collapsed protein than a rigidly extended one. To feel entropy for yourself, just pull on a rubber band, entropic effects just like this one are what you feel pulling back.

The collapse of EEA1  is an allosteric effect and a very long one, although the authors note long range allosteric effects are “not uncommon among coiled coil proteins”.

EEA1 is more complicated than initialy described. It contains amino acids which disrupt the 7 amino acid periodicity of the coiled coil (making it a jointed structure). The authors then made an EEA1 protein without the joints (so it was a perfect very long coiled coil). Binding of this protein to Rab5 on an endosome doesn’t result in collapse. So clearly normal EEA1 collapses at the ‘joints’.

The authors talk about some hypotheses as to how this happens in the Supplementary material (but I was unable to find).

So here’s a good research proejct for an enterprising grad student: either find out why and how a protein with multiple joints should exist in a fully extended configuration, or figure out how binding of Rab5 at one end of EEA1 produces such profound allosteric changes through this long linear protein. Happy hunting and thinking.

I must say it’s a pleasure to get back to chemistry after writing about the neurologic and medical issues of the presidential candidates.

Addendum 29 September — I wrote one the following to one of the authors (Dr. Grill) sending him the post above

Dr. Grill

Greatly enjoyed the paper.  I could never find the discussion of possible mechanism in the supplementary material.  You might enjoy the following post written about the paper

He replied as follows:

“Dear Luysii thank you very much for the kind words, and I really like your title!

With the supplementary discussion, besides the method part there is an additional supplement file on the Nature website that is easy to miss…I attach it here for you. We discuss this a bit more, but I must admit that this is not very satisfactory at the moment. We just don’t know how this works, and much of our efforts at the moment are dedicated to understand”
So for other readers of the original paper who also can’t find the supplement with the authors’ speculations as to what is going on– here  is what he sent.

” A key question is how Rab5 can induce such a long-range global molecular transition in flexibility of EEA1. Indeed, long-range allosteric effects have been observed for other coiled-coil proteins. In the case of myosin, the presence of discontinuities in the coiled-coil heptads drive structural changes to flexibility. Other tethering factors may bend through large breaks in coiled-coil structure acting as joints, although it remains to be shown whether and how conformational changes are triggered by Rab binding, as shown for EEA1.

Furthermore, a dynamically flexible coiled-coil is mostly extended, provided its ends are free60. However, when the ends of this coiled coil are tethered, bent, or when torsion is locally applied, compensatory structural changes are propagated and even amplified through the length of the structure. Our results suggest that a change in intrinsic static curvature may contribute but is not the major cause for the reduction in end-to-end distance. However, a more rigorous assessment would require visualizing the thermal fluctuations of the bound and unbound EEA1 very rapidly and in three dimensions.

Force generation due to entropic effects plays a key role in many processes in biology ranging from DNA cytoskeletal filaments to motor proteins. Switching a molecule from stiff to flexible could be an effective and general mechanism of many coiled-coil proteins for generating an attractive force, thereby pulling two objects together or allowing reactions otherwise hindered by polymer rigidity. Future experiments will test to what extent the entropic collapse is a general mechanism used not only by membrane tethers but also in other biological processes.”


The plural of anecdote IS data

Five years ago I wrote a post on the perils of implicating a gene as the cause of a disease because one or two people with the disease had a mutation there (see the bottom). That is now back in spades with a new report from the Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC) [ Nature vol. 536 pp. 249, 277 – 278, 285 – 291 ’16 ].

What they did was to aggregate sequence data from 60,704 people on the parts of their genomes coding for the amino acids making up proteins (the exome — The paper has 80+ authors. The data is publicly available and is planed to grow to 120,000 exomes and 20,000 whole genomes in the next year. Both are orders of magnitude larger than any individual exome study so far. So study enough anecdotes (small studies) and pretty soon you have real data

The articles state that over a million people have now had either their exomes or their whole genomes sequenced ! ! !

The amount of variation in the human genome is simply incredible. Some 7,404,909 variants in the exome were described, of which 54% had never been seen before. These account for 1/8 of all the sites in all our exomes, implying that the exome comprises 60 megaBases of the 3200 megaBase human genome (1.8%). Most of the variants were single amino acid changes due changes in a single nucleotide, but there were 317,381 insertions or deletions (95% shorter than 6 nucleotides).

99% of all variants had a frequency of under 1% (e.g. not found in in more than 607 people), with half being found only once in the 60,704. 8% of the sites with variation contain more than one (consistent with what you’d expect of a Poisson distribution).

What is so remarkable is that the average participant has 54 variants previously classified as responsible for a genetic disorder. Not only that 183/192 variants thought to cause a rare hereditary disease were found in many healthy people, implying that they were incidental findings (anecdotes) rather than causal. It shows you what happens when you have adequate data.

They are pretty sure that their work will stand, because the exomes were sequenced many times over (deeply sequenced in the lingo) more than 10x in over 80% of the cohort.

I’d also written earlier about how full of errors our genomes are — see

A lot of the variants produced termination codons in the body of the exome, so a full-length protein couldn’t be produced from the gene (these are called truncation variants) — some 179,774 in the 7,404,909. Most occurred just once. Even so this means that most of the cohort had at least one or two. Even this rather negative knowledge was useful — since we have about 20,000 protein coding genes, they found 3,230 in which truncation variants NEVER occurred, implying that the protein is crucial to survival.


We’ve found the mutation causing your disease — not so fast, says this paper (posted 17 July 2011)

This post takes a while to get to the main points, but hang in there, the results are striking (and disturbing).

First: a bit of history. In the bad old days (any time over about 30 years ago) there was basically only one way to look for a disc in the spinal canal pressing on a nerve producing symptoms (usually pain, followed by numbness and weakness). It was the myelogram, where a spinal tap was done, an oily substance (containing iodine which Xrays don’t penetrate well) was injected into the spinal canal, and Xrays taken. The disc showed up as a defect in the column of dye (not really a dye as any chemist can see). This usually led to surgery if a disc was found, even if it was one or two spinal levels from where clinicians thought it should be based on their examination and other tests such as electromyography (EMG). This was usually put down to anatomic variability. Results were less than perfect.

Myelography was a rather stressful procedure, and I usually brought patients into the hospital the night before, got a cardiogram (to make sure their heart could take it, and that they hadn’t had a silent heart attack). Then the myelography itself, which wasn’t painful as the radiologist put the needle in under fluoroscopy so they could see exactly where to go. However many people got severe post-spinal headaches (invariably doctor’s wives), sometimes requiring a blood patch to plug the hole where the (large) needle used to inject the ‘dye’ went — it had to be large because the ‘dye’ was rather oily (viscous). The bottom line was that you didn’t subject a patient to a myelogram unless they were having a significant problem. Only very symptomatic people had the test, and usually when nonsurgical therapy had been tried and failed.

Fast forward to the MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) era (nuclear magnetic resonance to the chemist, but radiologists were smart enough to get the word nuclear removed so patients would submit to the test). A painless technique, but stressful for some because of the close quarters in the MRI machine. You could look at the whole spinal canal, and see far more anatomic detail, because you actually see the disc (rather than its impression on a column of dye) and the surrounding bones, ligaments etc. etc.

What did we find? There were tons of people with discs where they shouldn’t be (e.g. herniated discs) who were having no problems at all. This led to a lot more careful assessment of patients, with far better correlation of anatomic defect and clinical symptoms.

What in the world does this all have to do with the genetics of disease? Patience; you’re about to find out.

There’s an interesting interview with Eric Lander (of Human Genome Project fame) in the current PNAS (p. 11319). He notes that in 1990 sequencing a single genome cost $3,000,000,000. He thinks that at some time in the next 5 years we’ll be able to do this for $1,000, a 3 million-fold improvement in cost. The genome has around 3,000,000,000 positions to sequence. As things stand now, it’s literally nothing to determine the sequence of a few million positions in DNA.

On to Cell vol. 145 pp. 1036 – 1048 ’11 which sequenced some 9,000,000 positions of DNA. This didn’t make a big splash (but its implications might). Just a single paper, buried in the middle of the 24 June ’11 Cell — it didn’t even rate an editorial. Now, as chemists, if you’re a bit shaky on what follows, all the background you need can be found in the series of articles found here –

As a neurologist, I treated a lot of patients with epilepsy (recurrent convulsions, recurrent seizures). 2% of children and 1% of adults have it (meaning that half of the kids with it will outgrow it, as did the wife of an old friend I saw this afternoon). Some forms of epilepsy run in families with strict inheritance (like sickle cell anemia or cystic fibrosis). 20 such forms have been tied down to single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 20 different genes coding for protein (there are other kinds of genes) — all is explained in the background material above). 17/20 of these SNPs are in a type of protein known as an ion channel. These channels are present in all our cells, but in neurons they are responsible for the maintenance of a membrane potential across the membrane, which has the ability change abruptly causing an nerve cell to fire an impulse. In a very simplistic way, one can regard a convulsion (epileptic seizure) as nerve cells gone wild, firing impulses without cease, until the exhausted neurons shut down and the seizure ends.

However, the known strictly hereditary forms of epilepsy account for at most 1 – 2% of all people with epilepsy. The 9,000,000 determinations of DNA sequence were performed on 237 ion channel genes, but just those parts of the genes actually coding for amino acids (these are the exons). They studied 152 people with nonhereditary epilepsy (also known as idiopathic epilepsy) and, most importantly, they looked at the same channels in 139 healthy normal people with no epilepsy at all.

Looking at the 17/237 ion channels known to cause strictly hereditary epilepsy they found that 96% of cases of nonhereditary (idiopathic) epilepsy had one or more missense mutations (an amino acid at a given position different than the one that should be there). Amazingly, 70% of normal people also had missense mutations in the 17. Looking at the broader picture of all 237 channels, they found 300 different mutations in the 139 normals, of which 23 were in the 17. Overall they found 989 SNPs in all the channels in the whole group, of which 415 were nonsynonumous.

Well what about mutational load? Suppose you have more than one mutation in the 17 genes. 77% the cases with idiopathic epilepsy had 2 or more mutations in the 17, but so did 30% of the people without epilepsy at all.

The relation between myelography and early genetic work on disease should be clear. Back then, a lot was taken as abnormal as only the severely afflicted could be studied, due to time, money and technological constraints. As the authors note “causality cannot be assigned to any particular variant”. Many potentially pathogenic genetic variants in known dominant channel genes are present in normals.

What was not clear to me from reading the paper is whether any of the previously described mutations in the 17 are thought to be causative of strictly hereditary epilepsy were present in the 139 normals.

A very interesting point is how genetically diverse the human population actually is (and they only studied Caucasians and Hispanics — apparently no Blacks). No individual was free of SNPs. No two individuals (in the 139 + 152) had the same set of SNPs. Since they found 989 SNPs in the combined group, even in this small sample of proteins (17 of 20,000) this averages out to more than 3 per individual. Well, are there ‘good’ SNPs in the asymptomatic group, and ‘bad’ SNPs in the patients with idiopathic epilepsy? Not really, the majority of the SNPs were present in both groups.

I leave it to your imagination what this means for ‘personalized medicine’. We’re literally just beginning to find out what’s out there. This is the genetic analog of the asymptomatic disc. We may not know all we thought we knew about genetics and disease. Heisenberg must be smiling, wherever he is.

What reading the literature is like when things are barely understood

There is a very exciting paper to be described in a post to appear shortly. I ran a muscular dystrophy clinic for 15 years, and saw lots of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) — even though, strictly speaking it is not a muscular dystrophy. The muscular Dystrophy Association was founded by parents of weak children, before we could actually separate motor neuron disease from myopathy. In retirement, I’ve kept up an interest in ALS (particularly since all I could do for patients as a doc was — (drumroll) — basically nothing).

The fact that a fair amount of even sporadic ALS has a problem with a protein called C9ORF72 was particularly fascinating. All this came out less than five years ago (October 2011). Everything is far from clearcut even now.

That being the case, it might be of interest to look at the notes I accumulated as scientists began to explore what was wrong with C9ORF72, how the protein normally does whatever it does (we still don’t know really) and how the mutated product of the gene causes trouble (there are 3 main theories).

What you’ll see in what follows is the heat of scientific battle (warts and all), where things are far from clear. Enjoy. This is basically what used to be called a core-dump (back in the day when computer memory was made of metallic cores). Things are far from cut and dried even now so it might be of interest to see the many angles of attack on the problem, the confusion, the conflicting theories, as things became a bit more clear. It’s the scientific enterprise in action against a very horrible disease (trust me).

I’ll try and clear up the typos. I’ll also try to put the notes on the papers in semi-chronological order, but I make no guarantees. The notes may be incomprehensible, as they include only what I didn’t know rather than all the background needed to understand what’s in them .

First a bit of background — FTD stands for FrontoTemporal Dementia.

The #9p21 chromosomal region is another locus for ALS/FTD. It contains something called C9orf72, which contains a GGGGCC hexnucleotide repeat in the intron between noncoding exons 1a and 1b. Normal alleles contain less than 24 repeats (range 2 – 23). Those with ALS + FTD contain over 30 (actually they think the repeat length is much higher — 700 to 1,600 ! ! !). ORF probably stands for open reading frame.

The expansion is present in 12% of familial FTD and 22.5% of familial ALS — making it the most common genetic abnormality in both conditions. More importantly it is found in 21% of sporadic ALS and 29% of FTD in the Finnish population. Later they say it is the most common genetic cause of sporadic ALS (but only in 4%).

There are 3 possible mechanisms of toxicity
l. The RNA transcribed from the repeat acts as an RNA sponge, binding all sorts of RNAs it shouldn’t
2. Repeat Assoaicted Non-ATG translation (RAN translation) see later
3. Decreased expression of the mRNA for C9ORF72.

[ Science vol. 338 pp. 1282 – 1283 ’12 ] Now 40% of familial ALS, 21% of familial frontotemporal dementia, and 8% of sporadic ALS, 5% of sporadic frontotemporal dementia have expansions in C9orf72.

Not much is known about C9orf72 — it is conserved across species. It contains no previously known protein domains. The expansion leads to loss of one alternatively spliced C9ORF72 isoform (normally 3 isoforms are expressed), and to the formation of nuclear RNA foci (which appear to be composed mostly of the expansion). [ Neuron vol. 79 pp. 416 – 438 ’13 ] The function of C9ORF72 is unknown (8/13).

The current (12/12) thinking is that the repeats produce a glob of RNA which traps RNA binding proteins which have better things to do. The best analogy is myotonic dystrophy in which an expanded 3 nucleotide repeat sequesters muscleblind, an RNA binding protein involved in splicing.

The expansion is present in 46% of familial ALS in Finland and 21% of sporadic ALS there. But Finns are somewhat different genetically. The expansion is found in 1/3 of European ancestry familial ALS.

Interestingly some of the patients with FTD presented with nonfluent progressive aphasia.

[ Cell vol. 152 pp. 691 – 698 ’13, Neuron vol. 77 pp. 639 – 646 ’13 ] The protein aggregates of C9orf72 mutants contain TDP43 inclusions. But they also show additional p62 and ubiquilin positive pathology (with no TDP43 present). The abnormal proteins are due to translation of the expanded GGGGCC repeats (which should be nonCoding as they are in introns). This is an example of Repeat Associated Non-ATG translation (RAN). This was first shown for expanded CAG repeats, which can be translated in all 3 reading frames giving polyGlutamine, polyLysine and polySerine . A minimum of 58 CAG repeats was required for translation.

This work looked for translation of GGGGCC in all 3 reading frames (poly glycine-proline, poly glycine-alanine, polyglycine-arginine. They found that poly glycine-proline was found and in the protein inclusions which were p62 positive and TDP43 negative. Similar inclusions weren’t present in other neurodegenerative diseases, known to have nucleotide inclusions.

[ Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. vol. 110 pp 7533 – 7534, 7778 – 7783 ’13 ] The expanded C9orf72 repeat is enough to cause neurodegeneration (mammalian neurons, and D. melanogaster). They placed either 3 or 30 copies of GGGCC into an epidermal growth factor vector between the start of transcription and the first ATG codon. The repeat can sequester the RNA binding protein Pur alpha (and other Pur family members). Interestingly, TDP43 didn’t bind to the repeat RNA, nor did hnRNP A2/B1 which binds to fragile X CGG repeat containing RNA. Overexpression of of Pur alpha is able to abort the neurogeneration in the mammalian neuonal cell line (Neuro-2a). So probably the excessive repeat number is acting as an RNA sponge.

Pur alpha is evolutionarily conserved. It controlls the cell cycle and differentiation. It is also a pomonent of the RNA transport granule. It interacts with Pur beta.

30 was as many repeats as they could manipulate experimentally — normals have 2 – 8 repeats, but patients with disease have from 100s to 1,000s of repeats, so the pathogenesis might be different.

[ Neuron vol. 80 pp. 257 – 258, 415 – 428 ’13 ] Expression of C9orf72’s mRNA in frontotemporal dementia/als (FTD/ALS) patients is reduced by 50%, and the expanded repeat and neighboring CgP islands are hypermethylated consistent with transcriptional silencing. Also the cytoplasmic aggregates staining positively for P62 appear to result from protein translation through the hexanucleotide repeat.

This work used induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from C9ALS/FTD patients. They show decreased C9orf72 mRNA, nuclear and cytoplasmic GGGGCC RNA foci, and expression of one RAN product (Gly Pro dipeptide). Neurons derived from the iPSCs also show enhanced sensitvity to glutamic acid excitotoxicity, and a transcriptional profile that ‘partially’ overlaps with transcriptional changes seen in iPSC neurons derived from mutant SOD1 ALS patients.

In addition, some 19 proteins were found which associate with the GGGGCC repeats in vitro. ADARB2 does this and participates in RNA editing.

ASOs (AntiSense OIigonucleotides ??) were used to suppress C9orf72 RNA expression. This led to reversal in many of the phenotypes of the iPSC neurons (suppression of glutamic acid toxicity, reduction in RNA foci formation). This implies that the GGGGCC repeats trigger toxicity through a gain of function mechanism. [ Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. vol. 110 pp. E4530 – E4539 ’13 ] Nuclear RNA foci containing GGGCC in patient cells (wbc’s fibroblasts, glia, neurons) were ssen in patients with repeat expansion. The Foci weren’t present in sporadic ALS or ALS/FTD caused by other mutations (SOD1, TDP43, tau), Parkinsonism, or nonNeurological controls. Antisense oligonucleotides reduced the GGGGCC containing nuclear foci without alteraling overall C9orf72 RNA levels. SiNRAS didn’t work.

The Rx was applied to living mice and it was well tolerated.

[ Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. vol. 110 pp E4968 – E4977 ’13 ] C9orf72 antisense transcripts are elevated in the brains of those with the expansion. Repeat expansion GGCCCC RNAs accumulate in nuclear foci in the brain. Sense and antisense foci accumulate in the blood and are potential biomarkers. RAN translation occurs in BOTH sense and antisense expansion transcripts — so all 6 proteins described above are made. The proteins accumulate in cytoplasmic aggregates in affected brain regions (e.g. frontal and motor cortex, spinal cord neurons).

[ Nature vol. 507 pp. 175 – 177, 195 – 200 ’14 ] C9orf72 has repeated hexanucleotide units (GGGGCC). Two or more G quartets stacked on top of one another form a G-quadruplex. In the expanded repeats of C9orf72 in ALS and frontotemporal dementia, stable quadruplexes form in DNA as well as the RNA transcribed from it.

Sequences which can form G-quadruplexes are conserved during evolution, so they presumably are doing something useful. They are found in transcriptional start sites. This work shows that G-quadruplex assembly in DNA increases transcriptional pauses in the expanded repeat (unsurprising). Also the G-quadruplexes in C9orf72 DNA promote the formation of stable R-loops — triple stranded structures that assemble when a newly form RNA transcript exiting RNA polymerase II invades the double helix and binds to one DNA strand, displacing the other. If the R-loops aren’t resolved, they can halt transcriptional elongation.

Not only that, but abortive GGGGCC containing RNAs accumulate in the spinal cord and motor cortex of patients with the expanded repeats. The RNAs are truncated in the GGGGCC region, and the amount is linearly proportional to the length of the hexanucleotide repeat. This explains how they could accumulate along with decreased level of full length C9orf72 mRNA (and presumably the protein made from it).

A ‘few dozen’ proteins binding the GGGGCC repeats have been found. One of them is nucleolin, involved in the formation of the ribosome within the nucleolus It is mislocalized to RNA foci in neurons of the motor cortex of patients with C9orf72 related disease. The lack of mature ribosomes results in the buildup of untranslated mRNA in the cytoplasm.

[ Science vol. 345 pp. 1118 – 1119, 1139 – 1145, 1192 – 1194 ’14 ] Normally the number of GGGGCC repeats in C9orf72 ranges from 2 to 23, with hundreds or even thousands of copies in the disease range. Possibilities
l. Interference with C9orf72 expression — e. g. loss of function
2. Sponging up RNA binding proteins by the transcript
3. Repeat associated non-ATG translation (RAN translation) in all reading frames (sense and antisense).

A series of stop codons in both the sense and antisense RNAs was engineered every 12 repeats, stopping formation of the dipeptide repeat proteins. The new RNAs still formed the G-quadruplexes, and both RNAs formed RNA foci when expressed in cultured neurons.

Putting them into Drosophila showed that the pure repeats able to form dipeptides causing degeneration in the fly eye, while the interrupted constructs (producing RNA only) did not. The same was true when expressed in the nervous systems of adult flies. Blocking translation of the RNA partially suppressed the phenotype.

There are 5 possible dipeptide products of RAN of GGGGCC (GA, GP, PA, GR, PR — G == Glycine, P == Proline, A == Alanine, R = Arginine). Then RNAs using alternate codons for the dipeptides were used (so GGGGCC wasn’t present). Expressing Glycine Arginine (GR) or Proline Arginine (PR) was toxic, Glycine Alanine showing ‘some’ toxicity later in life.

Some RNA binding proteins containing low complexity sequences (aka prion-like domains) — these are FUS, EWSR1, TAF14, hnRNPA2 — form polymeric assemblies, which incorporate into hydrogels in vitro. The assemblies are similar to RNA granules. Many of the RNA binding proteins associating with hydrogels hare serine arginine (SR) sequences. The SR domain proteins are regulated by phosphorylation on serine, also controlling the association with hydrogels. It is hypothesized that the GR and PR transcripts associate with hydrogels (or similar assemblies such as RNA granules), but are impervious to the regulatory action of the kinases (no serine to phosphorylate), so they might clog up the trafficking of SR domain containing RNA binding proteins moving in an out of the granules to transfer information throughout the cell.

[ Neuron vol 84 pp. 1213 – 1225 ’14 ] Proline Arginine dipeptides are neurotoxic. They form aggregates in nucleoli in experimental systems. Nuclear aggregates were also found in postmortem spinal cord from C9ORF72 ALS and ALS/FTD patients. Intronic GGGGCC transcripts are also toxic. Repeat associated non-ATG translation (RAN translation) is thought to depend on RNA hairpin structures using GC pairing.

[ Cell vol. 158 pp. 967 ’14 (abstract of something to appear in Science) ] Peptide translated from GGGGCC expansions containng arginines (Gly Arg and Pro Arg) are harmful — 3 other dipeptide repeats are harmless. The peptides bind to nucleoi and impede RNA biogenesis. Interestingly Ser-Arg repeats proteins (SR proteins) are important in RNA splicing. The GlyARG and PROARG repeat peptides alter splicing of the amino acid transporter EAAT2, similar to that seen in ALS. Interestingly, the peptides are readily taken up by cells in culture, translocating to the nucleus.

Also a small molecule has been developed which targets GGGGCC RNA expansions. It inhibits translation of the dipeptide repeat proteins from the expansions (see Science vol. 353 pp. 64 ****

GlyPro in CSF is a biomarker of ALS patients with the C9orf7s expansion.

The normal function of C9orf72 isn’t known. It is structurally related to DENN (Differentially Expressed in Normal and Neoplastic cells) proteins, which are GDP/GTP exchange factors for Rab GTPases.

At this point it isn’t known if the proteins generated by RAN are toxic. The protein inclusions are present in unaffected areas of the brain (lateral geniculate) as well as the vulnerable areas (cortex, hippocampus).

The initiation of RNA translation is thought to depend on RNA hairpin structures which use C:G complementary pairing. CAG (but not CAA) repeats undergo RAN translation. Protein aggregates occured only in brain intestes despite the fact that C9orf72 is expressed all over the body (but expression is highest in brain).

It is possible that antisense RNA could be formed from the opposite strand (e.g. CCCCGG) giving poly pro-ala, poly pro-gly and poly pro-arg.

[ Science vol. 1106 – 1112 ’15 ] Just expressing 66 GGGGCC repeats without an ATG start codon using an AdenoAssociated Virus (AAV) vector in mice was enough to produce neurodegeneration with RNA foci, inclusoins of poly QP, GA and GR and TDP43 pathology. There was cortical neuron and cerebellar Purkinje cell loss and gliosis.

[ Nature vol. 525 pp. 36 – 37, 56 – 61, 129 – 133 ’15 ] (GGGGCC)30 was expressed in the Drosophila eye. This leads to the rough eye trait and is easily scored, allowing you to look at the effect of other genes on it. Mutations activating RanGAP suppressed rough eyes. RanGAP binds to GGGGCC on the cytoplasmic face of the nuclear pore. Enhancing nuclear import or suppressing nuclear export of proteins also suppressed neurodegeneration. RanGAP physically interacts with the GGGGCC Hexanucleotide Repeat Expansion resulting in its mislocalization. The mislocalization is found in neurons derived from iPSCs from a patient with C9orf72 type ALS, and also in brain tissue from other patients with C9orf72 ALS.

Nuclear import is impaired due to HRE expression (fly and iPSC derived neurons). The defects can be ‘rescued’ by small molecules and antisense oligonucleotides targeting the HRE G-quadruplexes. This may actually be a way to Rx ALS ! ! ! !

Another paper crossed (GGGGCC)58 flies with missing chromosomal segments. They found a variety of nuclear import factors whose inactivation worsened rough eye.

Expression of constructs of in GGGGCC)8, 28 and 58 lacking an AUG start codon in Drosophila was done. The constructs could only produce Repeat Associated NonAUG translation products (e.g. dipeptides). The dipeptides disrupt nuclear import of fluorescent test substrates and of normal nuclear proteins (notably TDP43). In addition RNA export from the nucleus is also compromised. The deleterious effects could be modified by 18 genetic regions (found by large scale unbiased genetic screening). THey coded for components of the nuclear pore complex, nuclear RNA export machinery and nuclear import.

Dipeptides produced from GGGGCC and GGGGCCn’s disrupt the nucleolus, so this may be an additional cause of repeat toxicity.

[ Neuron vol. 88 pp. 892 – 901 ’15 ] A mouse model containng the full human C9orf72 repeat which was either normal (15 repeats) or expanded (100 – 1,000 repeats) — using bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) — thes mice are called C9-BACexpanded. They show widespread RNA foci and RAN translated dipeptides. Nucleolin distribution was altered. However the mice showed normal behavior and there was no neurodegenration. This is surprising.

[ Nature vol. 535 p. 327’16 (abstr. of Sci. Transl. Med ’16) ] Mice with mutations diminishing or eliminating the function of C9ORF72 (unknown as of 8/13) developed autoimmune disease.

[ Science vol. 351 pp. 1324 – 1329 ’16 ] Two independent mouse lines lacking the ortholog of C9orf72 (3110043021Rik) in all tissues developed normally and aged without any motor neuron disease. Instead they developed progressive splenomegaly and lymphadenopathy with accumulation of engorged macrophagelike cells. There was age related neuroInflammation similar to C9orf72 ALS but not sporadic ALS. There was no evidence of neurodegeneration however.

[ Neuron vol. 90 pp. 427 – 430, 531 -534, 535 – 550 ’16 ] BAC transgenic mice using patient derived gene constructs expressing (some of? all of?) C9ORF72 are reported.

A germline knockout develops blood abnormalities (splenomegaly, lymphadenopathy and premature death). The data conflict on which of the 5 products of RAN (Repeat Associated NonATG) translation are the most toxic (GP, GA, GR, PA, PA, PR).

In this study, mice with increased levels of repeats (up to 450) showed no evidence of motor neuron disease, and the brain was normal. They at least did have some trouble with cognition.

THe second study put in the full C9 gene with 5′ and 3′ flanking sequences. 4 lines of transgenics with repeats ranging from 37 to 500 were characterized. These mice did have peirpheral and central neurodegeneration, with motor deficits. There was a decrease in cortical neurons, Purkinje cells. This is the first time any transgenic has shown neurodegeneration. The deficits are reversible with antisense oligonucleotides. There was a disparity in disease expression between male and female mice.

RNA foci and DPR (DiPeptide Repeat) proteins don’t accumulate in the most affected brain regions.

[ Science vol. 353 pp. 647 – 648, 708 – 712 ’16 ] Spt4 is a highly conserved transcription elongation factor which regulates RNA polymerase II processivity (along with its binding partner Spt5). Spt4 is required to transcribe long trinucleotide repeats found in open reading frames, or in non protein coding regions of DNA templates (in S. cerevisiae). Mutations of Spt4 decrease synthesis of (and restored enzymatic activity to) expanded polyQ proteins (in yeast) without affecting genes lacking the excessive CAG repeats. It might also work in nonCAG repeats.

Targeting Spt4 (with antiSense oligonucleotides) reduces production of the C9orf72 expansion associated RNA and protein, and helps neurodegeneration in model systems. Repeat expansions are transcribed in both the sense and antisense directions. Yeast Spt4 (human homolog SUPT4H) is a small evolutionarily conserved zinc finger protein which forms a complex with Spt5, which then binds to RNA polymerase II regulating transcription elongation (pol II processivity).

DRB is a RNA polymerase II inhibitor. The complex of Spt4 and Spt5 homologs in man (SUPT4H, SUPT5H) is called DSIF (DRB Sensitivity Inducing Factor)

Depletion of Spt4 or its binding partner (Spt5 ) decreases the number of both sense and antisense repeat transcripts and RNA foci. One of the 6 RAN translation products (polyGlyPro) is substantially reduced by Spt4 depletion.

The study was in human c9ALS fibroblasts. However, side effects are certainly possible — in addition to decreasing the expression of C9ORF72, 95% depletion of SUPT4H1 altered (how?) the expression of another 300 genes. In mice deletion of both copies of SUPT4 is embryonic lethal, but deleting one produced no effects up to 18 months of age.

Time for drug chemists to go to the Multiplex

30 – 40% of all the drugs currently in clinical use are thought to target G Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs). Just how many GPCRs inhabit our genome isn’t clear. The latest estimate is 850 which is 4.2% of the 20,077 annotated protein genes we have. That being the case, it behooves drug chemists to know everything about them and how they work.

A recent paper [ Cell vol. 166 pp. 907 – 919 ’16 ] shows that a lot of the old thinking about GPCRs is wrong. Binding of a ligand to a GCPR results in a conformational change in its 7 transmembrane segments, so that the parts inside the cell bind to a heterotrimer of proteins which bind (and hydrolyze) GTP — this is the G protein. So far so good. The trimer splits up into its 3 constituents, unimaginatively called alpha, beta and gamma, each of which can act as a messenger that a ligand from outside the cell has landed on a GPCR, binding to other proteins causing all sorts of effects (e.g. can act as a second messenger)

All good things must end, and termination of GPCR signaling was thought to involve phosphorylation of the intracellular segment of the GPCR, binding of another protein (betaArrestin), removal from the cell membrane (so it can no longer bind its extracellular ligand) and then either destruction or recycling back to the cell membrane. So the old paradigm was betaArrestin binding equals the end of signaling.

It was thought that betaArrestin and the G protein competed for binding to the same intracellular amino acids of the GPCR. Not so says this paper. For some GPCRs both can bind, and signaling can continue, even though the complex of GPCR, G protein and betaArrestin is now inside the cell in an endosome. The complex is called the Multiplex. The examples given are GPCRs for parathyroid hormone (PTH) and Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH). Blurry pictures are given of the complex. GPCRs have been divided into several classes and GPCRs for TSH and PTH are class B GPCRs — which contain a long phosphorylatable tail in the cytoplasm. The G protein binds to these GPCRs by its core region, while betaArrestin binds to the tail. Signaling continues apace.

You are alive because the lipid bilayer of your plasma membrane is asymmetric

You are an organism with trillions of cells. A mosquito bit you depositing millions of viruses in your tissues. The virus can reproduce only within one of your cells and it has exploited all sorts of protein protein chemistry to get in. Antibodies (if you are fortunate enough to have them) can get rid of the extracellular critters. However, 500,000 have made into the same number of your cells, and are merrily trying to reproduce.

How does the asymmetry of the lipid bilayer of your plasma membrane help you survive. If each virus infected cell killed itself before the virus reproduced, you’d survive. Although 500,000 is a large number is is less than 1 millionth of your cell total.

Well you do have intracellular defenses against viruses, called the innate immune system. One of them is a protein with the ugly name of gasdermin D. The activated innate immune system (in the form of inflammatory caspases) cleaves gasdermin. This breaks up the inhibition of the amino terminal part of gasdermin by the carboxy terminal part giving a fragment which binds to one particular membrane component (phosphatidyl serine) which makes up 20% of the inner leaflet of the cell membrane. It then forms a large diameter (to a cell 140 Angstroms is quite large) pore in the cell membrane. No cell can survive this, so it dies, releasing cellular contents (probably some viral components but not fully formed one). For details see [ Nature vol. 535 pp 111 – 116, 153 – 158 ’16 ]

Wait a minute. The toxic gasdermin fragment is also released. So how come it doesn’t kill everything in sight? Because our cellular membranes keep phosphatidyl serine confined to the inner membrane, normal cells don’t show it on their exterior, so they can be bathed in gasdermin with no ill effect. What is responsible for this asymmetry — believe it or not an ATP consuming enzyme called flippase (about this more later) which takes any phosphatidyl serine it finds on the outer leaflet and schleps it back inside the cell.

There is all sorts of elegant chemistry which explains just how gasdermin binds to phosphatidyl serine and none of the many other phospholipids found on the inner leaflet. There is more elegant chemistry explaining how flippase works (see later).

What chemistry cannot explain, is why organisms would ‘want’ an asymmetric membrane. As soon as you get into the function of a particular compound in an organism, chemistry is powerless to tell you why. Nothing else can explain how a given molecule does what it does on the molecular level but that is not enough for a satisfying explanation.

One further explanation before some hard core cellular biochemistry follows (after ***). Our cells are dying all the time. The lining of your gut is replaced every 5 days. Even the longest lasting element of your blood is gone after half a year, and most other elements are turned over at least once a month. When these cells die, they must be cleaned up, without undue fuss (such as inflammation). The cleaners are cells called macrophages. A dying cell releases chemical signals, actually called ‘eat me’, one of which is phosphatidyl serine found on the membrane fragments of a dead cell. The fact that flippases keep it on the inner leaflet means that macrophages won’t attack a normal cell.

Slick isn’t it?


Flippase is a MgATPdependent aminophospholipid translocase. It localizes phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine to the inner membrane leaflet by rapidly translocating them from the outer to the inner leaflet against an electrochemical gradient. The stoichiometry between amino phospholipid translocation and ATP hydrolysis is close to one (how will the cell have enough ATP to do anything else?). The flippase is inhibited by high calcium, and by pseudosubstrates such as vanadate, acetylphosphate and para-nitrophenyl phosphate, and by SH reactive reagents such as N-ethylmaleimide and pyridyldithioethylamine (PDA) a specific inhibitor of phospholipid translocation

[ Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. vol. 109 pp. 1449 – 1454 ’12 ] P4-ATPases are a subfamily of P-type ATPases. They transport aminophospholipids from the exoplasmic to the cytoplasmic leaflet (and are known as flippases). Man has 14 P4-ATPases, expressed in various cell types. They are thought to be similar to the catalytic subunits of the Ca++ ATPase, and the Na, K ATPase, consisting of cytoplasmic, N, P and A domains and a membrane domain made of 10 transmembrane helices (M1 – M10).

[ Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. vol. 111 pp. E1334 – E1343 ’14 ] The P4-ATPases are thought to resemble the classic P-type ATPase cation pumps — a transmembrane domain of 10 helices and 3 cytoplasmic domains (P for phosphorylation, N for nucleotide binding and A for actuator). ATP8A2 forms an intermediate phosphorylated on aspartic acid (E2P)and undergoes a catalytic cycle similar to the sodium pump (Na+, K+ ATPase). Dephosphorylation of E2P is activated by the transported substrates phosphatidyl serine (PS) and phosphatidyl ethanolamine (PE), similar to the K+ activation of dephosphorylation in the sodium pump.

PE and PS are 10x as large as the cations transported by the sodium pump. This is known as the giant substrate problem. This work shows that isoleucine #364 (mutated in — patients with the ataxia, retardation and dysequilibrium syndrome Eur. J. Hum. Genet. vol. 21 pp. 281 – 285 ’13 aka CAMRQ syndrome ) forms a hydrophobic gate separating the entry and exit sites of PS. I364 likely directs the sequential formation and annihilation of water filled cavities (as shown by molecular dynamics simulations) allowing transport of the hydrophilic phospholipid head group, in a groove outlined by TMs 1, 2, 4 and 6, with the hydrocarbon chains following passively, still in the membrane lipid phase (and presumably outside the channel) — this must disrupt the hell out of the protein as it passes. They call this the credit card model — only the interaction with part of the molecule is important — just as the magnetic stripe is the only important thing about the credit card.

Another fail safe mechanism used by the cell — readthrough

Nothing is perfect in this world, not even the translation of mRNA into protein. The error rate is one amino acid misincorporated into a protein for every 10,000 or so done correctly — but these results are for one celled organisms (E. Coli, yeast). I can’t find a number for mammals, primates etc. etc.

This means that occasionally one of the 3 codons which tell the ribosome to quit (stop codons), will be misread as an amino acid. This is called readthrough, and means that the ribosome will merrily march on producing a much larger protein than coded for by the mRNA until one of two things happens. l. the ribosome reaches the end of the mRNA and stops. 2. the mRNA contains another stop codon (there are 3). The probability of this is 3/64 per codon. If stop codons are randomly distributed (which they are most certainly not in the protein coding segment of an mRNA) the chances of 100 codons in a row not containing a stop codon is under 1% (.822 % to be exact). So any protein containing more than 100 amino acids is a statistical freak in this sense. Since the 3′ untranslated region (3’UTR) of mRNA doesn’t code for protein, they should have stop codons randomly distributed (there being no selective pressure to keep them away).

Enter Nature vol. 534 pp. 719 – 723 ’16 — if you attach a 3′ UTR section of an mRNA to a normal protein sequence (mimicking readthrough) you get much less protein. The authors think the 3’UTRs code for peptide sequences destabilizing the attached protein. They don’t know what this might be, so it’s terra incognita for researchers, and a worthwhile PhD project to figure it out. Another example of ‘coding’ by a presumably nonCoding sequence in the genome. It may also tell us something about protein structure.

Why you do and don’t need chemistry to understand why we have big brains

You need some serious molecular biological chops to understand why primates such as ourselves have large brains. For this you need organic chemistry. Or do you? Yes and no. Yes to understand how the players are built and how they interact. No because it can be explained without any chemistry at all. In fact, the mechanism is even clearer that way.

It’s an exercise in pure logic. David Hilbert, one of the major mathematicians at the dawn of the 20th century famously said about geometry — “One must be able to say at all times–instead of points, straight lines, and planes–tables, chairs, and beer mugs”. The relationships between the objects of geometry were far more crucial to him than the objects themselves. We’ll take the same tack here.

So instead of the nucleotides Uridine (U), Adenine (A), Guanine (G), Cytosine (C), we’re going to talk about lock and key and hook and eye.

We’re going to talk about long chains of these four items. The order is crucial Two long chains of them can pair up only only if there are segments on each where the locks on one pair with the keys on the other and the hooks with the eyes. How many possible combinations of the four are there on a chain of 20 — just 4^20 or 2^40 = 1,099,511,621,776. So to get two randomly chosen chains to pair up exactly is pretty unlikely, unless in some way you or the blind Watchmaker chose them to do so.

Now you need a Turing machine to take a long string of these 4 items and turn it into a protein. In the case of the crucial Notch protein the string of locks, keys, hooks and eyes contains at least 5,000 of them, and their order is important, just as the order of letters in a word is crucial for its meaning (consider united and untied).

The cell has tons of such Turing machines (called ribosomes) and lots of copies of strings coding for Notch (called Notch mRNAs).

The more Notch protein around in the developing brain, the more the proliferating precursors to neurons proliferate before differentiating into neurons, resulting in a bigger brain.

The Notch string doesn’t all code for protein, at one end is a stretch of locks, keys, hooks and eyes which bind other strings, which when bound cause the Notch string to be degraded, mean less Notch and a smaller brain. The other strings are about 20 long and are called microRNAs.

So to get more Notch and a bigger brain, you need to decrease the number of microRNAs specifically binding to the Notch string. One particular microRNA (called miR-143-3p) has it in for the Notch string. So how did primates get rid of miR-143-3p they have an insert (unique to them) in another string which contains 16 binding sites for miR-143-3p. So this string called lincND essentially acts as a sponge for miR-143-3p meaning it can’t get to the Notch string, meaning that neuronal precursor cells proliferate more, and primate brains get bigger.

So can you forget organic chemistry if you want to understand why we have big brains? In the above sense you can. Your understanding won’t be particularly rich, but it will be at a level where chemical explanation is powerless.

No amount of understanding of polyribonucleotide double helices will tell you why a particular choice out of the 1,099,511,621,776 possible strings of 20 will be important. Literally we have moved from physicality to the realm of pure ideas, crossing the Cartesian dichotomy in the process.

Here’s a copy of the original post with lots of chemistry in it and all the references you need to get the molecular biological chops you’ll need.

Why our brains are large: the elegance of its molecular biology

Primates have much larger brains in proportion to their body size than other mammals. Here’s why. The mechanism is incredibly elegant. Unfortunately, you must put a sizable chunk of recent molecular biology under your belt before you can comprehend it. Anyone can listen to Mozart without knowing how to read or write music. Not so here.

I doubt that anyone can start from ground zero and climb all the way up, but here is all the background you need to comprehend what follows. Start here —
and follow the links (there are 5 more articles).

Also you should be conversant with competitive endogenous RNA (ceRNA) — here’s a link —

Also you should understand what microRNAs are — we’re still discovering all the things they do — here’s the background you need —

Still game?

Now we must delve into the embryology of the brain, something few chemists or nonbiological type scientists have dealt with.

You’ve probably heard of the term ‘water on the brain’. This refers to enlargement of the ventricular system, a series of cavities in all our brains. In the fetus, all nearly all our neurons are formed from cells called neuronal precursor cells (NPCs) lining the fetal ventricle. Once formed they migrate to their final positions.

Each NPC has two choices — Choice #1 –divide into two NPCs, or Choice #2 — divide into an NPC and a daughter cell which will divide no further, but which will mature, migrate and become an adult neuron. So to get a big brain make NPCs adopt choice #1.

This is essentially a choice between proliferation and maturation. It doesn’t take many doublings of a NPC to eventually make a lot of neurons. Naturally cancer biologists are very interested in the mechanism of this choice.

Well to make a long story short, there is a protein called NOTCH — vitally important in embryology and in cancer biology which, when present, causes NPCs to make choice #1. So to make a big brain keep Notch around.

Well we know that some microRNAs bind to the mRNA for NOTCH which helps speed its degradation, meaning less NOTCH protein. One such microRNA is called miR-143-3p.

We also know that the brain contains a lncRNA called lncND (ND for Neural Development). The incredible elegance is that there is a primate specific insert in lncND which contains 16 (yes 16) binding sites for miR-143-3p. So lncND acts as a sponge for miR-143-3p meaning it can’t bind to the mRNA for NOTCH, meaning that there is more NOTCH around. Is this elegant or what. Let’s hear it for the Blind Watchmaker, assuming you have the faith to believe in such things.

Fortunately lncND is confined to the brain, otherwise we’d all be dead of cancer.

Should you want to read about this, here’s the reference [ Neuron vol. 90 pp. 1141 – 1143, 1255 – 1262 ’16 ] where there’s a lot more.

Historically, this was one of the criticisms of the Star Wars Missile Defense — the Russians wouldn’t send over a few missles, they’d send hundreds which would act as sponges to our defense. Whether or not attempting to put Star Wars in place led to Russia’s demise is debatable, but a society where it was a crime to own a copying machine, could never compete technically to produce such a thing.

Why our brains are large: the elegance of its molecular biology

Primates have much larger brains in proportion to their body size than other mammals. Here’s why. The mechanism is incredibly elegant. Unfortunately, you must put a sizable chunk of recent molecular biology under your belt before you can comprehend it. Anyone can listen to Mozart without knowing how to read or write music. Not so here.

I doubt that anyone can start from ground zero and climb all the way up, but here is all the background you need to comprehend what follows. Start here —
and follow the links (there are 5 more articles).

Also you should be conversant with competitive endogenous RNA (ceRNA) — here’s a link —

Also you should understand what microRNAs are — we’re still discovering all the things they do — here’s the background you need —

Still game?

Now we must delve into the embryology of the brain, something few chemists or nonbiological type scientists have dealt with.

You’ve probably heard of the term ‘water on the brain’. This refers to enlargement of the ventricular system, a series of cavities in all our brains. In the fetus, all nearly all our neurons are formed from cells called neuronal precursor cells (NPCs) lining the fetal ventricle. Once formed they migrate to their final positions.

Each NPC has two choices — Choice #1 –divide into two NPCs, or Choice #2 — divide into an NPC and a daughter cell which will divide no further, but which will mature, migrate and become an adult neuron. So to get a big brain make NPCs adopt choice #1.

This is essentially a choice between proliferation and maturation. It doesn’t take many doublings of a NPC to eventually make a lot of neurons. Naturally cancer biologists are very interested in the mechanism of this choice.

Well to make a long story short, there is a protein called NOTCH — vitally important in embryology and in cancer biology which, when present, causes NPCs to make choice #1. So to make a big brain keep Notch around.

Well we know that some microRNAs bind to the mRNA for NOTCH which helps speed its degradation, meaning less NOTCH protein. One such microRNA is called miR-143-3p.

We also know that the brain contains a lncRNA called lncND (ND for Neural Development). The incredible elegance is that there is a primate specific insert in lncND which contains 16 (yes 16) binding sites for miR-143-3p. So lncND acts as a sponge for miR-143-3p meaning it can’t bind to the mRNA for NOTCH, meaning that there is more NOTCH around. Is this elegant or what. Let’s hear it for the Blind Watchmaker, assuming you have the faith to believe in such things.

Fortunately lncND is confined to the brain, otherwise we’d all be dead of cancer.

Should you want to read about this, here’s the reference [ Neuron vol. 90 pp. 1141 – 1143, 1255 – 1262 ’16 ] where there’s a lot more.

Historically, this was one of the criticisms of the Star Wars Missile Defense — the Russians wouldn’t send over a few missles, they’d send hundreds which would act as sponges to our defense. Whether or not attempting to put Star Wars in place led to Russia’s demise is debatable, but a society where it was a crime to own a copying machine, could never compete technically to produce such a thing.