Tag Archives: Amyloid precursor protein

Progress has been slow but not for want of trying

Progress in the sense of therapy for Alzheimer’s disease and Glioblastoma multiforme is essentially nonexistent, and we could use better therapy for Parkinsonism. This doesn’t mean that researchers have given up. Far from it. Three papers all in last week’s issue of PNAS came up with new understanding and possibly new therapeutic approaches for all three.

You’ll need some serious molecular biological and cell physiological chops to get through the following.

l. Glioblastoma multiforme — they aren’t living much longer than they were when I started pracice 45 years ago (about 2 years — although of course there are exceptions).

The human ZBTB family of genes consists of 49 members coding for transcription factors. BCL6 is also known as ZBTB27 and is a master regulator of lymph node germinal responses. To execute its transcriptional activity, BCL6 requires homodimerization and formation of a complex with a variety of cofactors including BCL6 corerpressor (BCoR), nuclear receptor corepressor 1 (NCoR) and Silencing Mediator of Retinoic acid and Thyroid hormone receptor (SMRT). BCL6 inhibitors block the interaction between BCL6 and its friends, selectively killing BCL6 addicted cancer cells.

The present paper [ Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. vol. 114 pp. 3981 – 3986 ’17 ] shows that BCL6 is required for glioblastoma cell viability. One transcriptional target of BCL6 is AXL, a tyrosine kinase. Depletion of AXL also decreases proliferation of glioblastoma cells in vitro and in vivo (in a mouse model of course).

So here are two new lines of attack on a very bad disease.

2. Alzheimer’s disease — the best we can do is slow it down, certainly not improve mental function and not keep mental function from getting worse. ErbB2 is a member of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) family. It is tightly associated with neuritic plaques in Alzheimer’s. Ras GTPase activation mediates EGF induced stimulation of gamma secretase to increase the nuclear function of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) intracellular domain (AICD). ErbB2 suppresses the autophagic destruction of AICD, physically dissociating Beclin1 vrom the VPS34/VPS15 complex independently of its kinase activity.

So the following paper [ Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. vol. 114 pp. E3129 – E3138 ’17 ] Used a compound downregulating ErbB2 function (CL-387,785) in mouse models of Alzheimer’s (which have notoriously NOT led to useful therapy). Levels of AICD declined along with beta amyloid, and the animals appeared smarter (but how smart can a mouse be?).

3.Parkinson’s disease — here we really thought we had a cure back in 1972 when L-DOPA was first released for use in the USA. Some patients looked so good that it was impossible to tell if they had the disease. Unfortunately, the basic problem (death of dopaminergic neurons) continued despite L-DOPA pills supplying what they no longer could.

Nurr1 is a protein which causes the development of dopamine neurons in the embryo. Expression of Nurr1 continues throughout life. Nurr1 appears to be a constitutively active nuclear hormone receptor. Why? Because the place where ligands (such as thyroid hormone, steroid hormones) bind to the protein is closed. A few mutations in the Nurr1 gene have been associated with familial parkinsonism.

Nurr1 functions by forming a heterodimer with the Retinoid X Receptor alpha (RXRalpha), another nuclear hormone receptor, but one which does have an open binding pocket. A compound called BRF110 was shown by the following paper [ Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. vol. 114 pp. 3795 – 3797, 3999 – 4004 ’17 ] to bind to the ligand pocked of RXRalpha increasing its activity. The net effect is to enhance expression of dopamine neuron specific genes.

More to the point MPP+ is a toxin pretty selective for dopamine neurons (it kills them). BRF110 helps survival against MPP+ (but only if given before toxin administration). This wouldn’t be so bad because something is causing dopamine neurons to die (perhaps its a toxin), so BRF110 may fight the decline in dopamine neuron numbers, rather than treating the symptoms of dopamine deficiency.

So there you have it 3 possible new approaches to therapy for 3 bad disease all in one weeks issue of PNAS. Not easy reading, perhaps, but this is where therapy is going to come from (hopefully soon).

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Will flickering light treat Alzheimer’s disease ?

Big pharma has spent zillions trying to rid the brain of senile plaques, to no avail. A recent paper shows that light flickering at 40 cycles/second (40 Hertz) can do it — this is not a misprint [ Nature vol. 540 pp. 207 – 208, 230 – 235 ’16 ]. As most know the main component of the senile plaque of Alzheimer’s disease is a fragment (called the aBeta peptide) of the amyloid precursor protein (APP).

The most interesting part of the paper showed that just an hour or so of light flickering at 40 Hertz temporarily reduced the amount of Abeta peptide in visual cortex of aged mice. Nothing invasive about that.

Should we try this in people? How harmful could it be? Unfortunately the visual cortex is relatively unaffected in Alzheimer’s disease — the disease starts deep inside the head in the medial temporal lobe, particularly the hippocampus — the link shows just how deep it is -https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hippocampus#/media/File:MRI_Location_Hippocampus_up..png

You might be able to do this through the squamous portion of the temporal bone which is just in front of and above the ear. It’s very thin, and ultrasound probes placed here can ‘see’ blood flowing in arteries in this region. Another way to do it might be a light source placed in the mouth.

The technical aspects of the paper are fascinating and will be described later.

First, what could go wrong?

The work shows that the flickering light activates the scavenger cells of the brain (microglia) and then eat the extracellular plaques. However that may not be a good thing as microglia could attack normal cells. In particular they are important in the remodeling of the dendritic tree (notably dendritic spines) that occurs during experience and learning.

Second, why wouldn’t it work? So much has been spent on trying to remove abeta, that serious doubt exists as to whether excessive extracellular Abeta causes Alzheimer’s and even if it does, would removing it be helpful.

Now for some fascinating detail on the paper (for the cognoscenti)

They used a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease (the 5XFAD mouse). This poor creature has 3 different mutations associated with Alzheimer’s disease in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) — these are the Swedish (K670B), Florida (I716V) and London (V717I). If that wasn’t enough there are two Alzheimer associated mutations in one of the enzymes that processes the APP into Abeta (M146L, L286V) — using the single letter amino acid code –http://www.biochem.ucl.ac.uk/bsm/dbbrowser/c32/aacode.html.hy1. Then the whole mess is put under control of a promoter particularly active in mice (the Thy1 promoter). This results in high expression of the two mutant proteins.

So the poor mice get lots of senile plaques (particularly in the hippocampus) at an early age.

The first experiment was even more complicated, as a way was found to put channelrhodopsin into a set of hippocampal interneurons (this is optogenetics and hardly simple). Exposing the channel to light causes it to open the membrane to depolarize and the neuron to fire. Then fiberoptics were used to stimulate these neurons at 40 Hertz and the effects on the plaques were noted. Clearly a lot of work and the authors (and grad students) deserve our thanks.

Light at 8 Hertz did nothing to the plaques. I couldn’t find what other stimulation frequencies were used (assuming they were tried).

It would be wonderful if something so simple could help these people.

For other ideas about Alzheimer’s using physics rather than chemistry please see — https://luysii.wordpress.com/2014/11/30/could-alzheimers-disease-be-a-problem-in-physics-rather-than-chemistry/

Baudelaire comes to Chemistry

Could an evil molecule be beautiful? In Les Fleurs du Mal, a collection of poems, Baudelaire argued that there was a certain beauty in evil. Well, if there ever was an evil molecule, it’s the Abeta42 peptide, the main component of the senile plaque of Alzheimer’s disease, a molecule whose effects I spent my entire professional career as a neurologist ineffectually fighting. And yet, in a recent paper on the way it forms the fibrils constituting the plaque I found the structure compellingly beautiful.

The papers are Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. vol. 113 pp. 9398 – 9400, E4976 – E4984 ’16. People have been working on the structure of the amyloid fibril of Alzheimer’s for decades, consistently stymied by its insolubility. The authors solved it not by Xray crystallography, not by cryoEM, but by solid state NMR. They basically looked at the distance constraints between pairs of isotopically labeled atoms, and built their model that way. Actually they built a bouquet of models using computer aided energy minimization of the peptide backbone. Another independent study produced nearly the same set.

The root mean square deviation of backbone atoms of the 10 lowest energy models of the bouquets in the two studies was small (.89 and .71 Angstroms). Even better the model bouquets of the two papers resemble each other.

There are two chains of Abeta42, EACH shaped like a double horseshoe (similar to the letter S). The two S’s meet around a twofold axis. The interface between the two S’s is form by two noncontiguous areas on each monomer (#15 – #17) and (#34 – #37).

The hydrophilic amino terminal residues (#1 – #14) are poorly ordered, but amino acids #15 – #42 are arranged into 4 short beta strands (I only see 3 obvious ones) that stack up and down the fibril into parallel in register beta-sheets. Each stack of double horseshoes forms a thread and the two threads twist around each other to form a two stranded protofilament.

Glycines allow sharp turns at the corners of the horseshoes. Hydrogen bonds between amides link the two layers of the fibrils. Asparagine side chains form ladders of hydrogen bonds up and down the fibrils. Water isn’t present between the layers because the beta sheets are so close together (counterintuitively this decreases the entropy, because water molecules don’t have to align themselves just so to solvate the side chains).

Each of the horseshoes is stabilized by hydrophobic interactions among the hydrophobic side chains buried in the core. Charged residues are solvent exposed. The interface between the two horsehoes is a hydrophobic interface.

Many of the famlial mutations are on the outer edges of double S structure — they are K16N, A21G, D23N, E22A, E22K, E22G, E22Q.

The surface hydrophobic patch formed by V40 and A42 may explain the greater rate of secondary nucleation by Abeta42 vs. Abeta40.

The cryoEM structures we have of Abeta42 are different showing the phenomenon of amyloid polymorphism.

The PNAS paper used reombinant Abeta and prepared homogenous fibrils by repeated seeding of dissolved Abeta42 with preformed fibrils. The other study used chemically synthesized Abeta and got fibrils without seeding. Details of pH, peptide concentration, salt concentration differed, and yet the results are the same, making both structures more secure.

The new structure doesn’t immediately suggest the toxic mechanism of Abeta.

To indulge in a bit of teleology — the structure is so beautiful and so intricately designed, that the aBeta42 peptide has probably been evolutionarily optimized to perform an (as yet unknown) function in our bodies. Animals lacking Abeta42’s parent (the amyloid precursor protein) don’t form neuromuscular synapses correctly, but they are viable.

A new kid on the Alzheimer’s block

There’s a new kid on the Alzheimer’s block, and it may explain why the huge sums thrown at beta-secretase inhibitors by big pharma has been such an abject failure. First, a lot of technical background.

The APP (for amyloid precursor protein) contains anywhere from 563 to 770 amino acids in 5 distinct transcripts made by alternate splicing of the single gene. The 3 main forms contain 695, 751 and 770 amino acids. The 695 amino acid form is found only in brain and peripheral nerve where it predominates, while the transcripts containing 751 and 770 amino acids are found everywhere but predominate in other tissues. The A4 peptides (Abeta peptides) which are the major components of the Alzheimer senile plaque are derived from from the carboxy terminal end of APP (beginning at amino acid #597 ) and contain only 39 – 43 amino acids. About 1/3 of the 39 – 43 amino acid amyloid beta peptide (A beta peptide) is found within the transmembrane segment of APP the other two thirds being found just outside the membrane.  So to get A beta peptides the APP must be cut (more than once) at its carboy terminal end.

For Abetaxx (xx between 39 and 43) to be formed, cleavage must occur outside the membrane in which APP is embedded by beta secretase. This produces a soluble extracellular fragment, with the rest embedded in the membrane (this is called C99). Then gamma secretase (another enzyme) cleaves C99 within the membrane forming the Abeta peptides, which constitute much of the senile plaque of Alzheimer’s disease.

Alpha secretase (yet another enzyme) also cleaves the APP in its carboxy terminal extramembranous part, but does so closer to the membrane, so that part of the protein which would form the aBeta peptide is removed.

R. Scheckman personal communication (2012) — The Abeta peptide is appears to be cleaved by gamma secretase from the fragment generated by beta secretase. However, this happens well inside the cell in the last station of the Golgi apparatus. Then Abeta is swept out of the cell by the secretory pathway. So all this happens INSIDE the cell, rather than at the neuron’s extracellular membrane (which is what I thought).

Remarkably it is very difficult (for me at least) to find out just at what amino acids of the amyloid precursor protein(s) the 3 secretases (alpha, beta, gamma) cleave.

[ Nature vol. 526 pp. 443 – 447 ’15 ] describes a totally new kid on the block, which (if replicated) should make us rethink everything we thought we knew about the amyloid precursor protein and the Abeta peptide. Another set of carboxy terminal fragments (CTFs) called CTFneta is formed from the amyloid precurosr protein (APP). Formation is mediated (in part) by MT5-MMP, a matrix metalloprotease. (In grad school neta is how we pronounced the Greek letter eta, which looks like a script N). The authors call the enzymatic activity forming them neta-secretase (clearly not all the enzymes which do this have been identified at this point). At least the authors tell you where the neta secretases cleave APP695 (between amino acids #504 – #505) . This is amino terminal to the beta and alpha sites (which are at higher amino acid numbers and the gamma site which is at a higher number still).  Alpha and beta secretase then work on CTFneta to produce shorter peptides, called Aneta-alpha, and Aneta-beta.

This isn’t idle chatter as Aneta-alpha, and Aneta-beta are found in the dystrophic neurites in an Alzheimer mouse model (human work is sure to follow). Inhibition of beta secretase activity results in accumulation of CTFneta and Aneta-alpha.

Aneta-alpha itself lowers long term potentiation (LTP) in hippocampal slices (LTP is considered by most to be the best molecular and physiological model we have of learning). As judged by intracellular calcium levels, hippocampal neuronal activity is also inhibited by Aneta-alpha.

What’s fascinating about all this, is that the work possibly explains why the huge amount of money big pharma has spend on beta secretase inhibitors has been such a failure.

Takes me right back to grad school

How many times in grad school did you or your friends come up with a good idea, only to see it appear in the literature a few months later by someone who’d been working on it for much longer. We’d console ourselves with the knowledge that at least we were thinking well and move on.

Exactly that happened to what I thought was an original idea in my last post — e.g. that Gemfibrozil (Lopid) might slow down (or even treat) Alzheimer’s disease. I considered the post the most significant one I’d ever written, and didn’t post anything else for a week or two, so anyone coming to the blog for any reason would see it first.

A commenter on the first post gave me a name to contact to try out the idea, but I’ve been unable to reach her. Derek Lowe was quite helpful in letting me link to the post, so presently the post has had over 200 hits. Today I wrote an Alzheimer’s researcher at Yale about it. He responded nearly immediately with a link to an ongoing clinical study in progress in Kentucky

On Aug 3, 2015, at 3:04 PM, Christopher van Dyck wrote:

Dear Dr. xxxxx

Thanks for your email. I agree that this is a promising mechanism.
My colleague Greg Jicha at U.Kentucky is already working on this:
https://www.nia.nih.gov/alzheimers/clinical-trials/gemfibrozil-predementia-alzheimers-disease

Our current efforts at Yale are on other mechanisms:
http://www.adcs.org/studies/Connect.aspx

We can’t all test every mechanism, but hopefully we can collectively test the important ones.

-best regards,
Christopher H. van Dyck, MD
Professor of Psychiatry, Neurology, and Neurobiology
Director, Alzheimers Disease Research Unit

Am I unhappy about losing fame and glory being the first to think of it?  Not in the slightest.  Alzheimer’s is a terrible disease and it’s great to see the idea being tested.

Even more interestingly, a look at the website for the study shows, that somehow they got to Gemfibrozil by a different mechanism — microRNAs rather than PPARalpha.

I plan to get in touch with Dr. Jicha to see how he found his way to Gemfibrozil. The study is only 1 year in duration, and hopefully is well enough powered to find an effect. These studies are incredibly expensive (and an excellent use of my taxes). I never been involved in anything like this, but data mining existing HMO data simply has to be cheaper. How much cheaper I don’t know.

Here’s the previous post —

Could Gemfibrozil (Lopid) be used to slow down (or even treat) Alzheimer’s disease?

Is a treatment of Alzheimer’s disease at hand with a drug in clinical use for nearly 40 years? A paper in this week’s PNAS implies that it might (vol. 112 pp. 8445 – 8450 ’15 7 July ’15). First a lot more background than I usually provide, because some family members of the afflicted read everything they can get their hands on, and few of them have medical or biochemical training. The cognoscenti can skip past this to the text marked ***

One of the two pathologic hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease is the senile plaque (the other is the neurofibrillary tangle). The major component of the plaque is a fragment of a protein called APP (Amyloid Precursor Protein). Normally it sits in the cellular membrane of nerve cells (neurons) with part sticking outside the cell and another part sticking inside. The protein as made by the cell contains anywhere from 563 to 770 amino acids linked together in a long chain. The fragment destined to make up the senile plaque (called the Abeta peptide) is much smaller (39 to 42 amino acids) and is found in the parts of APP embedded in the membrane and sticking outside the cell.

No protein lives forever in the cell, and APP is no exception. There are a variety of ways to chop it up, so its amino acids can be used for other things. One such chopper is called ADAM10 (aka Kuzbanian). ADAM10breaks down APP in such a way that Abeta isn’t formed. The paper essentially found that Gemfibrozil (commercial name Lopid) increases the amount of ADAM10 around. If you take a mouse genetically modified so that it will get senile plaques and decrease ADAM10 you get a lot more plaques.

The authors didn’t artificially increase the amount of ADAM10 to see if the animals got fewer plaques (that’s probably their next paper).

So there you have it. Should your loved one get Gemfibrozil? It’s a very long shot and the drug has significant side effects. For just how long a shot and the chain of inferences why this is so look at the text marked @@@@

****

How does Gemfibrozil increase the amount of ADAM10 around? It binds to a protein called PPARalpha which is a type of nuclear hormone receptor. PPARalpha binds to another protein called RXR, and together they turn on the transcription of a variety of genes, most of which are related to lipid metabolism. One of the genes turned on is ADAM10, which really has never been mentioned in the context of lipid metabolism. In any event Gemfibrozil binds to PPARalpha which binds more effectively to RAR which binds more effectively to the promoter of the ADAM10 gene which makes more ADAM10 which chops of APP in such fashion that Abeta isn’t made.

How in the world the authors got to PPARalpha from ADAM10 is unknown — but I’ve written the following to the lead author just before writing this post.

Dr. Pahan;

Great paper. People have been focused on ADAM10 for years. It isn’t clear to me how you were led to PPARgamma from reading your paper. I’m not sure how many people are still on Gemfibrozil. Probably most of them have some form of vascular disease, which increases the risk of dementia of all sorts (including Alzheimer’s). Nonetheless large HMOs have prescription data which can be mined to see if the incidence of Alzheimer’s is less on Gemfibrozil than those taking other lipid lowering agents, or the population at large. One such example (involving another class of drugs) is JAMA Intern Med. 2015;175(3):401-407, where the prescriptions of 3,434 individuals 65 years or older in Group Health, an integrated health care delivery system in Seattle, Washington. I thought the conclusions were totally unwarranted, but it shows what can be done with data already out there. Did you look at other fibrates (such as Atromid)?

Update: 22 July ’15

I received the following back from the author

Dear Dr.

Wonderful suggestion. However, here, we have focused on the basic science part because the NIH supports basic science discovery. It is very difficult to compete for NIH R01 grants using data mining approach.

It is PPARα, but not PPARγ, that is involved in the regulation of ADAM10. We searched ADAM10 gene promoter and found a site where PPAR can bind. Then using knockout cells and ChIP assay, we confirmed the participation of PPARα, the protein that controls fatty acid metabolism in the liver, suggesting that plaque formation is controlled by a lipid-lowering protein. Therefore, many colleagues are sending kudos for this publication.

Thank you.

Kalipada Pahan, Ph.D.

The Floyd A. Davis, M.D., Endowed Chair of Neurology

Professor

Departments of Neurological Sciences, Biochemistry and Pharmacology

So there you have it. An idea worth pursuing according to Dr. Pahan, but one which he can’t (or won’t). So, dear reader, take it upon yourself (if you can) to mine the data on people given Gemfibrozil to see if their risk of Alzheimer’s is lower. I won’t stand in your way or compete with you as I’m a retired clinical neurologist with no academic affiliation. The data is certainly out there, just as it was for the JAMA Intern Med. 2015;175(3):401-407 study. Bon voyage.

@@@@

There are side effects, one of which is a severe muscle disease, and as a neurologist I saw someone so severely weakened by drugs of this class that they were on a respirator being too weak to breathe (they recovered). The use of Gemfibrozil rests on the assumption that the senile plaque and Abeta peptide are causative of Alzheimer’s. A huge amount of money has been spent and lost on drugs (antibodies mostly) trying to get rid of the plaques. None have helped clinically. It is possible that the plaque is the last gasp of a neuron dying of something else (e.g. a tombstone rather than a smoking gun). It is also possible that the plaque is actually a way the neuron was defending itself against what was trying to kill it (e.g. the plaque as a pile of spent bullets).

Could Gemfibrozil (Lopid) be used to slow down (or even treat) Alzheimer’s disease?

Is a treatment of Alzheimer’s disease at hand with a drug in clinical use for nearly 40 years? A paper in this week’s PNAS implies that it might (vol. 112 pp. 8445 – 8450 ’15 7 July ’15). First a lot more background than I usually provide, because some family members of the afflicted read everything they can get their hands on, and few of them have medical or biochemical training. The cognoscenti can skip past this to the text marked ***

One of the two pathologic hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease is the senile plaque (the other is the neurofibrillary tangle). The major component of the plaque is a fragment of a protein called APP (Amyloid Precursor Protein). Normally it sits in the cellular membrane of nerve cells (neurons) with part sticking outside the cell and another part sticking inside. The protein as made by the cell contains anywhere from 563 to 770 amino acids linked together in a long chain. The fragment destined to make up the senile plaque (called the Abeta peptide) is much smaller (39 to 42 amino acids) and is found in the parts of APP embedded in the membrane and sticking outside the cell.

No protein lives forever in the cell, and APP is no exception. There are a variety of ways to chop it up, so its amino acids can be used for other things. One such chopper is called ADAM10 (aka Kuzbanian). ADAM10breaks down APP in such a way that Abeta isn’t formed. The paper essentially found that Gemfibrozil (commercial name Lopid) increases the amount of ADAM10 around. If you take a mouse genetically modified so that it will get senile plaques and decrease ADAM10 you get a lot more plaques.

The authors didn’t artificially increase the amount of ADAM10 to see if the animals got fewer plaques (that’s probably their next paper).

So there you have it. Should your loved one get Gemfibrozil? It’s a very long shot and the drug has significant side effects. For just how long a shot and the chain of inferences why this is so look at the text marked @@@@

****

How does Gemfibrozil increase the amount of ADAM10 around? It binds to a protein called PPARalpha which is a type of nuclear hormone receptor. PPARalpha binds to another protein called RXR, and together they turn on the transcription of a variety of genes, most of which are related to lipid metabolism. One of the genes turned on is ADAM10, which really has never been mentioned in the context of lipid metabolism. In any event Gemfibrozil binds to PPARalpha which binds more effectively to RAR which binds more effectively to the promoter of the ADAM10 gene which makes more ADAM10 which chops of APP in such fashion that Abeta isn’t made.

How in the world the authors got to PPARalpha from ADAM10 is unknown — but I’ve written the following to the lead author just before writing this post.

Dr. Pahan;

Great paper. People have been focused on ADAM10 for years. It isn’t clear to me how you were led to PPARgamma from reading your paper. I’m not sure how many people are still on Gemfibrozil. Probably most of them have some form of vascular disease, which increases the risk of dementia of all sorts (including Alzheimer’s). Nonetheless large HMOs have prescription data which can be mined to see if the incidence of Alzheimer’s is less on Gemfibrozil than those taking other lipid lowering agents, or the population at large. One such example (involving another class of drugs) is JAMA Intern Med. 2015;175(3):401-407, where the prescriptions of 3,434 individuals 65 years or older in Group Health, an integrated health care delivery system in Seattle, Washington. I thought the conclusions were totally unwarranted, but it shows what can be done with data already out there. Did you look at other fibrates (such as Atromid)?

Update: 22 July ’15

I received the following back from the author

Dear Dr.

Wonderful suggestion. However, here, we have focused on the basic science part because the NIH supports basic science discovery. It is very difficult to compete for NIH R01 grants using data mining approach.

It is PPARα, but not PPARγ, that is involved in the regulation of ADAM10. We searched ADAM10 gene promoter and found a site where PPAR can bind. Then using knockout cells and ChIP assay, we confirmed the participation of PPARα, the protein that controls fatty acid metabolism in the liver, suggesting that plaque formation is controlled by a lipid-lowering protein. Therefore, many colleagues are sending kudos for this publication.

Thank you.

Kalipada Pahan, Ph.D.

The Floyd A. Davis, M.D., Endowed Chair of Neurology

Professor

Departments of Neurological Sciences, Biochemistry and Pharmacology

So there you have it.  An idea worth pursuing according to Dr. Pahan, but one which he can’t (or won’t).  So, dear reader, take it upon yourself (if you can) to mine the data on people given Gemfibrozil to see if their risk of Alzheimer’s is lower.  I won’t stand in your way or compete with you as I’m a retired clinical neurologist with no academic affiliation. The data is certainly out there, just as it was for the JAMA Intern Med. 2015;175(3):401-407 study.  Bon voyage.

@@@@

There are side effects, one of which is a severe muscle disease, and as a neurologist I saw someone so severely weakened by drugs of this class that they were on a respirator being too weak to breathe (they recovered). The use of Gemfibrozil rests on the assumption that the senile plaque and Abeta peptide are causative of Alzheimer’s. A huge amount of money has been spent and lost on drugs (antibodies mostly) trying to get rid of the plaques. None have helped clinically. It is possible that the plaque is the last gasp of a neuron dying of something else (e.g. a tombstone rather than a smoking gun). It is also possible that the plaque is actually a way the neuron was defending itself against what was trying to kill it (e.g. the plaque as a pile of spent bullets).

Is sleep deprivation like Alzheimer’s and why we need sleep in the first place

Ask a cardiologist why the heart needs to pump and you’ll get a strange look. Ask any neuroscientist why the brain needs to sleep, and they’ll scratch their head — until now perhaps. A paper in Science a few days ago may have the answer [ Science vol. 342 pp. 316 – 317, 373 – 377 ’13 ] Essentially the brain gets washed out during sleep.

First — a bit of history. The tissue of the brain is so tightly packed that it is impossible to see the cells that make it up with the usual stains used by light microscopists. People saw nuclei all right but they thought the brain was a mass of tissue with nuclei embedded in it (like a slime mold). Muscle is like that — long fibers with hundreds of nuclei here and there. It wasn’t until that late 1800′s that Camillo Golgi developed a stain which would now and then outline a neuron with all its processes. Another anatomist (Ramon Santiago y Cajal) used Golgi’s technique and argued with Golgi that yes the brain was made of cells. Fascinating that Golgi, the man responsible for showing nerve cells, didn’t buy it. This was a very hot issue at the time, and the two received a joint Nobel prize in 1906 (only 5 years after the prizes began).

How tightly packed are the cells in the brain? The shortest wavelength of visible light is 4000 Angstroms. Cells in the brain are packed far more tightly. To see the space between the brain cell external membranes you need an electron microscope (EM). Just preparing a sample for EM really fries the tissue. Neurons are packed together with less than 1000 Angstroms between them. So how much of this is artifact of preparation for electron microscopy has never been clear to me. One study injected a series of quantum dots of known diameter into the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) to see the smallest sized dot that could insinuate itself between neurons [ Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. vol. 103 pp. 5567 – 5572 ’06 ]. The upper limit was around 350 Angstroms. No wonder the issue was contentious when all they had was light microscopy.

Surprisingly, the PNAS paper comes up with an estimate that brain extracellular space comprises 20% of brain volume. I find this hard to accept given the above. So how does the brain get rid of waste products? It turns out that there is a circulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of sorts. Inject a tracer that you can follow into the CSF. After a period of time the tracer enters the brain along arteries (not veins) and after still more time it leaves the brain along the veins (not the arteries). How the tracer gets to veins isn’t discussed in the Science papers. This has been called by the horrible name of the glymphatic system (don’t ask).

Using a great deal of ingenuity, experimental finesse and some very cooperative mice, the flow of CSF into, through and out of the brain was studied. Several findings are striking — the extracellular space (aka interstitial volume) dearly doubles (from 14% to 23%) during sleep. More importantly, the flow into the brain decreases by 95% when you wake the mouse up. Presumably flow out of the brain decreases by the same amount during wake. CSF flow into the brain was present only in the surface exposed to bulk CSF when the animals were awake.

So what? The Abeta peptide is held by many to be the culprit in Alzheimer’s disease. When injected into the mouse cerebral cortex (hardly a physiologic procedure) Abeta peptide is cleared twice as fast from the brain during sleep. We all know that you don’t think as well when sleep deprived, and this may be why. The current thinking on Alzheimer’s is that it isn’t the visible plaques that you can see under the microscope (made largely of Abeta peptide aggregates), but the soluble form of Abeta which you can’t see which causes the trouble. This always struck me as a cop out similar to the way docs would say that labyrinthitis was due to a virus (not that anyone every isolated one). You might as well say both are due to angels (or devils).

So the difficulty thinking with sleep deprivation may be similar to Alzheimer’s disease, if similar goings on occur in our brain. Distinguish this from the sleepiness due to sleep deprivation –Alzheimer patients often have disturbed sleep patterns, but they aren’t particularly sleepy when they’re awake.

The sleepiness may be due to the build up of something else. Bulk flow of fluid is incredibly nonspecific, and will carry anything soluble along with it. Adenosine has been mentioned as one metabolite building up which makes us sleepy. Probably looking for a single compound washed out by CSF as ‘the’ cause of sleepiness or cognitive problems, is like looking for ‘the’ single compound in kidney failure causing similar symptoms. It’s everything the kidney/brain filters and gets rid of.

So, at very long last, we may have found out why we spend 1/3 of our lives asleep.