Author Archives: luysii

see first post

Biden is in early dementia — more evidence

In an earlier post (reproduced below the ***) I gave my reasons based on (presumably unedited) tapes of the President for concluding that President Biden is in the early stages of dementia.  I am a retired board certified neurologist and occasional board examiner with 34 years of clinical experience.

Here is further evidence.

In a town hall meeting put on by CNN 21 July President Biden became rather incoherent and confused when answering “When will children under 12 be able to get vaccinated.”

Here is the (presumably) unedited video of the meeting — https://www.cnn.com/2021/07/21/politics/full-president-joe-biden-cnn-town-hall-july-21/index.html.

The question was asked 6 minutes and 20 seconds into the recording.  The response starts to make not much sense at 7 minutes and at 7 minutes 21 seconds, he briefly becomes incoherent.  He continues on in this vein up to about 8 minutes.

This is what early dementia looks like.

Well that’s my opinion.  Look at the tape and make your own.

****  The earlier post

Biden is in early dementia — the evidence

As a neurologist I am often asked about Biden’s mental capacity.  My first post on the subject occurred after the first debate with Trump.  I thought he was intact — you can read about it here.

https://luysii.wordpress.com/wp-admin/post.php?post=5200&action=edit&calypsoify=1

Then I was asked to comment on the possibility that his previous operation for aneurysm could be causing trouble. I didn’t think this was likely as so much time had passed.  Interestingly, I knew the neurosurgeon as a Penn undergraduate when I was a neurology resident.  You can read the post at the end — Biden’s cerebral aneurysm.

That was written last December.

I changed my opinion after his press conference. of 14 June ’21 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PAWRHM4i3Dg
I strongly suggest you look at the segment at 15 minutes where his response makes little sense, and then he shuts down completely for 7 seconds, apparently quite confused. That’s my reading of the video. Form your own opinion.

Then on June 23rd I was sent another clip where he was confused

It is an 8 minute speech, and the clip can be found at 2 minutes, again showing an episode of confusion.

 

But first a story:

As a third year medical student on psychiatry rotation,  I interviewed a Bryn Mawr student who was on the psych ward (my wife was also an undergraduate at the time).  I well knew the intensity of the place, and how much pressure the girls (see the end of the post) put on themselves.  So I talked and talked and commiserated with her.  After a pleasant enough time the I concluded the interview and left.   The teaching psychiatrist asked me what I thought, and I told him how frigtening I found it given what I knew about Bryn Mawr. He asked me if I found out that she thought the television was talking to her.  Basically by yapping when she went off track, I kept her sane.

So I learned to shut up, and let people tell me what was wrong with them.  This is why Biden likely did well during the debates. The short time given to answer and the barrage of questions and interruptions kept him focused.

It really came home as I looked at the whole 8 minutes of the second clip trying to find the brief period of confusion.  Please look at the whole clip yourself and draw your own conclusions.  I see a pleasant,  rambling, slow thinking,  occasionally confused old man.

 

This is what early dementia looks like.

I was severely criticized by a follower after the first post.  Here it is,  “Issuing alarmist statements about his mental health is reprehensible. You are not his physician. Moreover, armchair diagnosis is frowned upon by the American Psychiatric Association.I’ve been following your blog for several years and also have been reading you comments on the “in the pipeline” blog. On the basis of that experience I had not expected to stoop that low.”

In my defense, I was defeated by the new WordPress editor which wouldn’t let me bring in the evidence shown here.  Apparently it was a (still extant) incompatibility of Safari with the editor.   I was still impressed enough by how confused Biden looked that I posted it anyway.

As the late Carl Sagan said “extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence”. So here is the evidence (finally).  Apologies for the delay.

As children, our least favorite explanation was ‘because I say so’.

Essentially that’s part of what I’m offering here.  I was involved in clinical neurology from ’67 to ’00, and at a minimum saw at least 1 demented patient a week during that time.  That’s an underestimate, as I’d make rounds on other neurologists patients when covering weekends.  I doubt that anyone reading this has similar extensive experience.

So Biden just looks like all the early dementia patients I saw during that time.  Given my experience, I think that should carry some weight.

The fact that Biden appears sharp at times is typical of early stage dementia.  I’ve certainly seen it in family and friends, with such things being excused as ‘it must have been the heat’ or ‘they must not have been feeling well’.

Why is this important?  Khrushchev’s estimate of President Kennedy’s weakness lead to the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962. Khrushchev’s son confirmed this when he spoke at the Kennedy Center at Harvard.   Kennedy was receiving narcotics for his back.  The side effects of what little medicines we had back then weren’t appreciated.  Example: thyroid and amphetamines were used to help people lose weight.

Biden does not appear mentally strong to Putin or Xi (or me).

  • Yes women undergraduates at Bryn Mawr and other members of the seven sisters called themselves girls (or at least were called that by males wishing to date them).  According my wife, who just corrected me,  Bryn Mawr undergraduates called themselves women, in contrast to a nearby educational institution which advertised “Are you a Harcum Girl?”  Similarly, 10 years later Native Americans in Montana called themselves Indians, not having the benefit of the linguistic and moral improvements to which we have currently ascended.

The post about Biden’s cerebral aneurysm surgery — https://luysii.wordpress.com/2020/12/08/bidens-cerebral-aneurysm/

A possible new way to attack Parkinson’s disease

Alpha-synuclein is the main component of the Lewy body of Parkinson’s disease.  It contains 140 amino acids, and is ‘natively unfolded’ in that it has no apparent ordered secondary structure (alpha helices, beta pleated sheets) detectable by a variety of methods — far ultraviolet circular dichroism, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy or NMR spectroscopy. When the protein binds to artificial membranes half of it forms alpha helices.   Amazingly, after a huge amount of work we don’t know what alpha-Synuclein actually does.  Knockouts have only minor CNS abnormalities.

However, alpha synuclein forms fibrils which bind to cell surface receptors with internalization and transmission to other cells, just like prions.   Two such receptors for alpha-synuclein fibrils are Lymphocyte Activation Gene E (LAG3) and Amyloid PrecursorLike Protein 1 (ALPL1).

LAG3 has 4 immunoglobulin like domains (D1 – D4).  It uses D1 to capture the carboxy terminus which is exposed and concentrated on the surface of the alpha-synuclein fibrils.

Interestingly the monomers are said to adopt a self-shielded conformation which impedes the exposure of the carboxy terminus.  Phosphorylation of serine #129 enhances the binding of alpha-synuclein preformed fibrils to LAG3 and APLP1.  So the carboxy terminus of alpha-synuclein is a promising traget to block Parkinson’s disease progression.

How a doctor must learn to think

The previous post (found just below) is a textbook example of how a doctor (e.g. me) thinks about medical issues.

“A steady rise in COVID-19 is continuing this week as the state reported 208 new cases Wednesday.

Updated data from the Massachusetts Department of Public Health shows that new cases last week rose 46% over the previous week. The updated percentage includes cases from last week that were reported Wednesday. It’s the second week in a row that cases rose after more than two months of decline that hit a pandemic low the week of June 20.”

Well those are the first two paragraphs of https://www.masslive.com/coronavirus/2021/07/just-one-month-aver-hitting-pandemic-lows-new-covid-cases-in-massachusetts-continue-to-rise-as-delta-variant-spreads.html

Which led to the post

Here are the next two paragraphs

“Deaths continue to remain low, however, with one new COVID death being reported on Wednesday. A total of 17,648 Massachusetts residents have died from the virus since the start of the pandemic.

Hospitalizations ticked back up to 102 after hitting a low of 80 on July 4. They have slowly been trending back up since then. Of the hospitalizations, 37 are in intensive care and 17 are intubated.”

 

If they led with the second two paragraphs no one would have read the article.
This is typical in several ways of the medical literature

 

l. Make the most spectacular claim you can first off to grab the readers attention — we’re in another wave of the epidemic

2. The actual data don’t seem to support the lead (things just aren’t that bad).

Eventually I’d read each medical paper wondering how the authors were lying to me — for a horrible example (from Johns Hopkins yet — please see   https://luysii.wordpress.com/2009/10/05/low-socioeconomic-status-in-the-first-5-years-of-life-doubles-your-chance-of-coronary-artery-disease-at-50-even-if-you-became-a-doc-or-why-i-hated-reading-the-medical-literature-when-i-had-to/

So now the doc has to deal with two conflicting pieces of information.  This never happens in math (which is why I love reading it in retirement).  You can prove anything from assuming a statement and its negation are both true.  Here’s how Bertrand Russell proved that he was the Pope starting with 1 = 2. “Either the Pope and I are one person or we are two people. If 1=21=2 then in either case we are one person. Therefore, I am the Pope.”

 

So the doc has to reach into his/her store of knowledge to figure it out.  Well, he/she knows that most COVID-19 stay in the hospital for longer than a day.  Clearly not all the 208 cases wound up in the hospital as there were only 102 COVID-19 cases in the hospital.  I’m guessing that the median (not average) length of hospital stay for COVID-19 is two weeks.

 

But it’s more complicated than that (https://www.nuffieldtrust.org.uk/resource/chart-of-the-week-how-long-do-covid-19-patients-spend-in-hospital) as in England the median length of stay ranged from 5 to 10 in the past year.

 

So how many ‘cases’ of COVID-19 were there in Massachusetts — the excellent statistics of the Department of Health says about 1,000 in the past two weeks.
So if there are only 100 in hospital and the average stay is 10 days (I couldn’t find data for Massachusetts — again this is typical of medical practice — you can’t find the data you really want), 90% of the COVID-19 cases aren’t severe enough to be hospitalized.

 

This led to the conclusion in the first part of the post “What does the rise in COVID-19 cases mean?  NOT MUCH.”

 

The data is quite similar to that from Los Angeles — http://publichealth.lacounty.gov/media/coronavirus/data/index.html
1,827 cases on the 17th, 500 COVID-19 cases in the hospital.  Assume that cases are rising and figure 1,000 cases/day over the past 10 days, and you get to 95% of ‘cases’ not sick enough to be hospitalized.

 

When the normal person thinks of a ‘case’ of a disease, they think of someone who is physically ill.  Not so with COVID-19, and this is incredibly dishonest reporting by the press, various health departments etc. etc.

 

My post ends with “Presently nearly all the deaths from COVID-19 are in people who were not vaccinated, so to lower your odds further please get vaccinated.”

I couldn’t track this down to any sort of hard data.  It certainly is plausible, but how may plausible medical ideas have I seen crash and burn.  The Associated Press quotes a former official in the Obama administration making this claim.  At least they identify him Andrew Slavitt — a former investment banker — rather than an anonymous source.

Addendum 21 July

“There’s a common theme among those behind the worsening COVID-19 numbers, said Dr. Rochelle Walensky, director of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:

“This is becoming a pandemic of the unvaccinated,” Walensky said at a COVID-19 briefing Friday.”

More than 97% of people getting hospitalized with COVID-19 now are unvaccinated, Walensky said. And 99.5% of deaths are among the unvaccinated, US Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy said Sunday.”

Even more reason to get vaccinated.

*****

What is a ‘case’ of COVID-19

What does the rise in COVID-19 cases mean?  NOT MUCH.  Here’s how the local paper played it — https://www.masslive.com/coronavirus/2021/07/just-one-month-aver-hitting-pandemic-lows-new-covid-cases-in-massachusetts-continue-to-rise-as-delta-variant-spreads.html

There were 208 ‘cases’ today 14 July 2021   in Massachusetts, which is a rate 46% higher than last week. In the past two weeks there have been about 1,000 cases according to the Massachusetts department of health. https://www.mass.gov/info-details/covid-19-response-reporting#covid-19-interactive-data-dashboard-

So the hospitals must be packed and deaths must be soaring.  Right?

Wrong — the same article tells us that there are currently 100 people in Massachusetts hospitals with COVID-19 and that there was one death today

This means that what they are calling a case of COVID-19 is not enough to put 90% of people with it in the hospital.  Most of the ‘cases’ of COVID-19 in Massachusetts are either asymptomatic or mild.

It’s hard to find comparable statistics from states with lower vaccination rates (e.g. the south) but deaths are also lower there.

Well what about the Delta variant?  It is definitely more infectious, and the disease it causes is more severe.  We should be in big trouble if Delta takes over in the USA.  Right?

Wrong.  Delta has taken over.  According to the CDC, Delta accounts for 58% of all new cases of COVID-19 in the USA — https://abcnews.go.com/Health/delta-variant-now-accounts-58-covid-19-cases/story?id=78834579.   Deaths have not spiked.  The vaccines are working.

Presently nearly all the deaths from COVID-19 are in people who were not vaccinated, so to lower your odds further please get vaccinated.

My friends and I did — https://luysii.wordpress.com/2021/05/19/anti-vaxers-what-is-it-that-you-know-that-we-dont/

What is a ‘case’ of COVID-19

What does the rise in COVID-19 cases mean?  NOT MUCH.  Here’s how the local paper played it — https://www.masslive.com/coronavirus/2021/07/just-one-month-aver-hitting-pandemic-lows-new-covid-cases-in-massachusetts-continue-to-rise-as-delta-variant-spreads.html

There were 208 ‘cases’ today 14 July 2021   in Massachusetts, which is a rate 46% higher than last week. In the past two weeks there have been about 1,000 cases according to the Massachusetts department of health. https://www.mass.gov/info-details/covid-19-response-reporting#covid-19-interactive-data-dashboard-

So the hospitals must be packed and deaths must be soaring.  Right?

Wrong — the same article tells us that there are currently 100 people in Massachusetts hospitals with COVID-19 and that there was one death today

This means that what they are calling a case of COVID-19 is not enough to put 90% of people with it in the hospital.  Most of the ‘cases’ of COVID-19 in Massachusetts are either asymptomatic or mild.

It’s hard to find comparable statistics from states with lower vaccination rates (e.g. the south) but deaths are also lower there.

Well what about the Delta variant?  It is definitely more infectious, and the disease it causes is more severe.  We should be in big trouble if Delta takes over in the USA.  Right?

Wrong.  Delta has taken over.  According to the CDC, Delta accounts for 58% of all new cases of COVID-19 in the USA — https://abcnews.go.com/Health/delta-variant-now-accounts-58-covid-19-cases/story?id=78834579.   Deaths have not spiked.  The vaccines are working.

Presently nearly all the deaths from COVID-19 are in people who were not vaccinated, so to lower your odds further please get vaccinated.

My friends and I did — https://luysii.wordpress.com/2021/05/19/anti-vaxers-what-is-it-that-you-know-that-we-dont/

A premature book review and a 60 year history with complex variables in 4 acts

“Visual Differential Geometry and Forms” (VDGF) by Tristan Needham is an incredible book.  Here is a premature review having only been through the first 82 pages of 464 pages of text.

Here’s why.

While mathematicians may try to tie down the visual Gulliver with Lilliputian strands of logic, there is always far more information in visual stimuli than logic can appreciate.  There is no such a thing as a pure visual percept (a la Bertrand Russell), as visual processing begins within the 10 layers of the retina and continues on from there.  Remember: half your brain is involved in processing visual information.  Which is a long winded way of saying that Needham’s visual approach to curvature and other visual constructs is an excellent idea.
Needham loves complex variables and geometry and his book is full of pictures (probably on 50% of the pages).

My history with complex variables goes back over 60 years and occurs in 4 acts.

 

Act I:  Complex variable course as an undergraduate. Time late 50s.  Instructor Raymond Smullyan a man who, while in this world, was definitely not of it.  He really wasn’t a bad instructor but he appeared to be thinking about something else most of the time.

 

Act II: Complex variable course at Rocky Mountain College, Billings Montana.  Time early 80s.  The instructor and MIT PhD was excellent.  Unfortunately I can’t remember his name.  I took complex variables again, because I’d been knocked out for probably 30 minutes the previous year and wanted to see if I could still think about the hard stuff.

 

Act III: 1999 The publication of Needham’s first book — Visual Complex Analysis.  Absolutely unique at the time, full of pictures with a glowing recommendation from Roger Penrose, Needham’s PhD advisor.  I read parts of it, but really didn’t appreciate it.

 

Act IV 2021 the publication of Needham’s second book, and the subject of this partial review.  Just what I wanted after studying differential geometry with a view to really understanding general relativity, so I could read a classmate’s book on the subject.  Just like VCA, and I got through 82 pages or so, before I realized I should go back and go through the relevant parts (several hundred pages) of VCA again, which is where I am now.  Euclid is all you need for the geometry of VCA, but any extra math you know won’t hurt.

 

I can’t recommend both strongly enough, particularly if you’ve been studying differential geometry and physics.  There really is a reason for saying “I see it” when you understand something.

 

Both books are engagingly and informally written, and I can’t recommend them enough (well at least the first 82 pages of VDGF).

 

Ubiquitination isn’t just for proteins

Time to look up from the plow biochemists.  Everyone knows that ubiquitin is added to proteins to destroy them.  The carboxy terminal amino acid of ubiquitin (glycine) forms an amide with the epsilon amino acid of a lysine called an isopeptide bond, and off  the protein goes to the proteasome for destruction.  This is simplistic and ubiquitination has many other other roles in the cell, but there isn’t time for it here.

I couldn’t resist putting in two interesting facts about ubiquitin.

#1. Like sharks,  evolution hasn’t changed ubiquitin much — only 3/71 amino acids differ between yeast and us.

#2 Ubiquitin is so stable that boiling water doesn’t denature it < Science vol. 365 pp. 502 – 505 ’19 >.

We have over 600 E3 enzymes (ubiquitin ligases), 40 E2 enzymes, and 8 E1 enzymes, and all 3 types are required to add ubiquitin to proteins.

Once a bacterium gets inside a cell, one of the ways the innate immune system attacks it is by ubiquitinating its proteins.  Nothing out of the ordinary there.

Salmonella (the organism responsible for most cases of food poisoning) is one such.  Our cells ubiquitinate the hell out of it.  However Nature vol. 594 pp. 28 – 29, 111 – 116 ’21 shows that, not just Salmonella proteins are the only sites of ubiquitination.  We also ubiquitinate endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide) which is a combination of sugars and lipids, with nary an amino acid in sight.  Endotoxin is a component of the outer membrane of every Gram negative bacterium, so the effect is likely not confined to Salmonella.

Even more spectacular is the enzyme adding ubiquitin.  It is called RNF213 (aka Mysterin), which looks like nothing the classic E3 enzymes we know and love.  For one thing in addition to E3 activity, it has a motor domain, a zinc binding domain and other domains of unknown function.  It’s a real monster with 5,184 amino acids and a molecular mass of 584 kiloDaltons.

There is a lot of interesting molecular biology to RNF213 — mutations cause Moya moya disease.

But the papers are particularly interesting because they show a lot of work of a new type needs to be done.

What else does Mysterin ubiquitinate?  Are there other enzymes in the cell adding ubiquitin, and if so, what do they ubiquitinate?

Definitely time to expand the well plowed field of ubiquitin.

Frameshifting

It is a pleasure to get back to the science after the ugly real world intruded with

l. A president in early dementia — https://luysii.wordpress.com/2021/06/30/biden-is-in-early-dementia-the-evidence/

2. The latest in politically correct racism  — https://luysii.wordpress.com/2021/07/03/hitler-would-have-loved-it/

but these things needed to be addressed.

I was very pessimistic about the chance of a vaccine for the pandemic based on my experience with AIDS/HIV1.  Why? Because no vaccine for HIV1 has been forthcoming despite 40 years of intense effort.  I am delighted to be wrong about pandemic vaccines.

But AIDS isn’t the kiss of death it was when I was in practice back in the 80s.  Why?  Because we know so much about what happens after the virus infects cells.  We attack all it’s weak points, from its genome, its reverse transcriptase.  So AIDs is now a chronic manageable disease.

So the more we know about SARS-Cov-2 the more ways we’ll find to attack it.   Which brings me to Science vol. 372 pp. 1306 – 1313 ’21.

The pandemic virus SARS-CoV-2 (and all coronaviruses) use something called frameshifting.

Here is a brief tutorial

Her fox and dog ate our pet rat

H erf oxa ndd oga teo urp etr at

He rfo xan ddo gat eou rpe tra t

The last two lines make no sense at all, but (neglecting the spaces) they have identical letter sequences.

Here are similar sequences of nucleotides making up the genetic code as transcribed into RNA

ATG CAT TAG CCG TAA GCC GTA GGA

TGC ATT AGC CGT AAG CCG TAG GA.

GCA TTA GCC TAA GCC GTA GGA ..

Again, in our genome there are no spaces between the triplets. But all the triplets you see are meaningful in the sense that they each code for one of the twenty amino acids (except for TAA which says stop). ATG codes for methionine (the purists will note that all the T’s should be U). I’m too lazy to look the rest up, but the ribosome doesn’t care, and will happily translate all 3 sequences into the sequential amino acids of a protein.

Both sets of sequences have undergone (reading) frame shifts. The examples are of +1 and +2 frameshifts.

SARS-CoV-2 uses a -1 frameshift.  this is necessary for the synthesis of nonstructural protein 12 (nsp12), crucially important to the virus as it codes for the viral RNA dependent RNA polymerase.

To produce the frameshift, the virus actually throws a monkey wrench at the ribosome.  At the site of the future frameshift the viral genome forms a pseudoknot  (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pseudoknot) which blocks the smooth translation of the ribosome along the viral genome, then it backs up by 1 (the -1 frameshift) and chugs on.

So PNAS vol. 118 32023051118 ’21 threw the kitchen sink (e.g. every compound they could think of) at the virus to find one which stopped the frameshift and they found one: merafloxacin a fluoroquinolone.  There are all sorts of fluoroquinolones in use as antibodies, so it’s time to try the others out.

This is unlikely to be a general approach to coronavirus therapy, as the RNA sequence at the frameshift site is likely to be different in each coronavirus.

I don’t think frameshifting occurs in eukaryotic cells, but I’m not sure.  Does anyone out there know?

 

Hitler would have loved it

The following appeared in Science 2 July ’21 as an editorial  — https://science.sciencemag.org/content/sci/373/6550/7.full.pdf

Director Lander, the time is now

page1image1390173936

The Biden administration’s decision to elevate the Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) to a cabinet-level position is a win for science. Eric Lander, confirmed in May by the Senate, is now advising the president on the scientific, engineering, and technological policies of the US government. As Dr. Lander carries out this task, we hope that he keeps in mind what President Biden asked him in a letter in January: “How can we guarantee that the fruits of science and technology are fully shared across America and among all Americans?”

The challenges ahead are formidable. The devastating health and economic impacts of two major crises—climate change and the COVID-19 pandemic—have revealed deep societal fault lines that prevent the United States from drawing on the talents of all Americans to tackle these problems. Thus, there is an urgent need for smart and socially minded policy-making.

OSTP should work with all federal research agencies to eliminate bias throughout their systems and in existing and new funding programs.

A major charge placed on OSTP by President Biden is to ensure that science and technology flourish in America. This starts with making inclusive STEM education a priority, as many STEM classrooms at top US universities still lack students from underrepresented groups. Despite all the efforts to address education equity, the US educational system is still producing disproportionately fewer racially underrepresented Americans for jobs in science and engineering. For example, in 2019, Black, Hispanic, American Indian/Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian/ Other Pacific Islander groups received 4.4, 12.1, 0.4, and 0.2% of engineering bachelor’s degrees, respectively. This underrepresentation is most stark for Blacks, who make up14%of“GenZ”(6to24years old). Similarly, women accounted for only 22.5% of engineering bachelor’s degrees in 2019. Left uncorrected, the negative impact on the US technical workforce size and innovation will be vast, as students of color will soon represent nearly 48% of high school graduates. Moreover, COVID-19 pandemic hardships might cause an exodus of women and racially underrepresented role models—those most affected by the pandemic—from STEM, setting back already lagging equity efforts.

Concomitantly, leadership within national funding agencies and at federally funded universities must change. These positions cannot remain the privilege of Jews—only 14% of higher education administration are non-Jews despite their 38% representation in the population. Women and non-Jewish scientists cannot continue to be given junior fellowships, only to be derailed from professional advancement later by majority Jewish gatekeepers. A cultural change is also needed to retain those in the STEM career pipeline. Accountability systems for discrimination, sexism, racism, and harassment need overhauls—their burden cannot continue to crush and end the careers of victims and truth tellers.

The answer to President Biden’s question to Director Lander is clear: OSTP must guide the administration toward policies that mandate all stakeholders to attract, nurture, and promote the best and brightest across all populations in the United States. The steps toward implementing these policies will be hard. Nevertheless, the American people are ready, and the time is now.

–Omolola Eniola-Adefeso and Hana El-Samad

Omolola Eniola-Adefeso
is the University Diversity and Social Transformation Professor
in Chemical Engineering
and a professor
of Biomedical Engineering and Macromolecular Sciences at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. lolaa@ umich.edu

Hana El-Samad

is the Kuo Family Endowed Professor and vice-chair in the Department

of Biochemistry and Biophysics
at the University
of California, San Francisco, CA, USA. hana.el-samad@ ucsf.edu

page1image1530098224

If the fruits of science and
technology are to be truly shared,
they should be produced by all
Americans. This cannot happen
if the scientific enterprise toler-
ates insidious systemic racism
and sexism. That membership in
the academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine remains predominantly Jewish  and male speaks volumes. Such stark disparity also exists in federal institutions that support research and training in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) and biomedi- cine. For example, National Institutes of Health (NIH) intramural senior investigators from underrepresented groups (Black, Hispanic, Alaska Native/American In- dian) constitute only 5.1% (and women only 24%), and Black scientists remain 55% less likely than Jew scientists to receive NIH’s extramural funding. This year, the agency announced that all NIH Institutes and Centers are now jointly focused on identifying and correcting structural racism. However, this acknowledgment of the problem is only a first step. For example, although funding research on health disparities through the new NIH UNITE initiative is important, it is essential to recognize that such initiatives will not solve racial inequality problems in science. A system that pigeon- holes scientists into a narrow racial interest bin must be overhauled. Racially underrepresented scientists are as likely to put the first humans on Mars, for example, as they are to solve health disparity problems.

I did change the word white where it appeared to Jew.  Otherwise the editorial is untouched.  Doesn’t sound so antiRacist now does it?page1image1390355664

Biden is in early dementia — the evidence

As a neurologist I am often asked about Biden’s mental capacity.  My first post on the subject occurred after the first debate with Trump.  I thought he was intact — you can read about it here.

https://luysii.wordpress.com/wp-admin/post.php?post=5200&action=edit&calypsoify=1

Then I was asked to comment on the possibility that his previous operation for aneurysm could be causing trouble. I didn’t think this was likely as so much time had passed.  Interestingly, I knew the neurosurgeon as a Penn undergraduate when I was a neurology resident.  You can read the post at the end — Biden’s cerebral aneurysm.

That was written last December.

I changed my opinion after his press conference. of 14 June ’21 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PAWRHM4i3Dg
I strongly suggest you look at the segment at 15 minutes where his response makes little sense, and then he shuts down completely for 7 seconds, apparently quite confused. That’s my reading of the video. Form your own opinion.

Then on June 23rd I was sent another clip where he was confused

It is an 8 minute speech, and the clip can be found at 2 minutes, again showing an episode of confusion.

 

But first a story:

As a third year medical student on psychiatry rotation,  I interviewed a Bryn Mawr student who was on the psych ward (my wife was also an undergraduate at the time).  I well knew the intensity of the place, and how much pressure the girls (see the end of the post) put on themselves.  So I talked and talked and commiserated with her.  After a pleasant enough time the I concluded the interview and left.   The teaching psychiatrist asked me what I thought, and I told him how frigtening I found it given what I knew about Bryn Mawr. He asked me if I found out that she thought the television was talking to her.  Basically by yapping when she went off track, I kept her sane.

So I learned to shut up, and let people tell me what was wrong with them.  This is why Biden likely did well during the debates. The short time given to answer and the barrage of questions and interruptions kept him focused.

It really came home as I looked at the whole 8 minutes of the second clip trying to find the brief period of confusion.  Please look at the whole clip yourself and draw your own conclusions.  I see a pleasant,  rambling, slow thinking,  occasionally confused old man.

 

This is what early dementia looks like.

I was severely criticized by a follower after the first post.  Here it is,  “Issuing alarmist statements about his mental health is reprehensible. You are not his physician. Moreover, armchair diagnosis is frowned upon by the American Psychiatric Association.I’ve been following your blog for several years and also have been reading you comments on the “in the pipeline” blog. On the basis of that experience I had not expected to stoop that low.”

In my defense, I was defeated by the new WordPress editor which wouldn’t let me bring in the evidence shown here.  Apparently it was a (still extant) incompatibility of Safari with the editor.   I was still impressed enough by how confused Biden looked that I posted it anyway.

As the late Carl Sagan said “extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence”. So here is the evidence (finally).  Apologies for the delay.

As children, our least favorite explanation was ‘because I say so’.

Essentially that’s part of what I’m offering here.  I was involved in clinical neurology from ’67 to ’00, and at a minimum saw at least 1 demented patient a week during that time.  That’s an underestimate, as I’d make rounds on other neurologists patients when covering weekends.  I doubt that anyone reading this has similar extensive experience.

So Biden just looks like all the early dementia patients I saw during that time.  Given my experience, I think that should carry some weight.

The fact that Biden appears sharp at times is typical of early stage dementia.  I’ve certainly seen it in family and friends, with such things being excused as ‘it must have been the heat’ or ‘they must not have been feeling well’.

Why is this important?  Khrushchev’s estimate of President Kennedy’s weakness lead to the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962. Khrushchev’s son confirmed this when he spoke at the Kennedy Center at Harvard.   Kennedy was receiving narcotics for his back.  The side effects of what little medicines we had back then weren’t appreciated.  Example: thyroid and amphetamines were used to help people lose weight.

Biden does not appear mentally strong to Putin or Xi (or me).

  • Yes women undergraduates at Bryn Mawr and other members of the seven sisters called themselves girls (or at least were called that by males wishing to date them).  According my wife, who just corrected me,  Bryn Mawr undergraduates called themselves women, in contrast to a nearby educational institution which advertised “Are you a Harcum Girl?”  Similarly, 10 years later Native Americans in Montana called themselves Indians, not having the benefit of the linguistic and moral improvements to which we have currently ascended.

 

 

Biden’s cerebral aneurysm

Biden is in early dementia

If you got to this post for some reason or other please go immediately to https://luysii.wordpress.com/2021/06/30/biden-is-in-early-dementia-the-evidence/

am having much trouble with the wordpress editor and hope to have a full post out soon with links and video clips showing exactly what I mean. Forget the spin in the text of the links, just look at the clips and make up your own mind. Sorry.

Addendum 21 June ’21

Many apologies for posting the above without documentation. I’m still working with WordPress to get a functional editor.

In the meantime, I strongly suggest that you look at Biden’s press conference of 14 June ’21 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PAWRHM4i3Dg
particularly the segment at 15 minutes where his response makes little sense, and then he shuts down completely for 7 seconds, apparently quite confused. That’s my reading of the video.

Here’s the data. Reach your own conclusion about what you are seeing. 

More to follow when I get the editor working.

People with early dementia act like this intermittently, with normal functioning most of the time. I’ve certainly seen this in two very high functioning family members. We’d say things like ‘it must have been the heat’, or he/she ‘must have been very tired’.