Tag Archives: Abeta peptide

Amyloid Structure at Last ! 3 The Alzheimer mutations

I am republishing this post from last October, because the excellent paper I’m going to write about has similar thinking.

Although the chemistry explaining why these mutations are associated with Alzheimer’s disease is exquisite and why they point to ‘the’ cause of Alzheimer’s disease — the amyloid fibril, billions have been spent in attempts to remove amyloid fibrils with no useful therapeutic result (and some harm)

Here’s the old post

The structure of the amyloid fibril formed by the aBeta42 peptide exactly shows why certain mutations are associated with hereditary Alzheimer’s disease.   Here is a picture

https://www.alzforum.org/news/research-news/danger-s-bends-new-structure-av42-fibrils-comes-view

Scroll down to the picture above “Bonds that Tie”

If you need some refreshing on the general structure of amyloid, have a look at the first post in the series — https://luysii.wordpress.com/2021/10/11/amyloid-structure-at-last/

Recall that in amyloid fibrils the peptide backbone is flat as a flounder (well in a box 4.8 Angstroms high) with the amino acid side chains confined to this plane.  The backbone winds around in this plane like a snake.  The area in the leftmost loop is particularly crowded with bulky side chains of glutamic acid (single letter E) at position 22 and aspartic acid (single letter D) at position 23 crowding each other.  If that wasn’t enough, at the physiologic pH of 7 both acids are ionized, hence negatively charged.  Putting two negative charges next to each other costs energy and makes the sheet making up the fibril less stable.

The marvelous paper (the source for much of this) Cell vol. 184 pp. 4857 – 4873 ’21 notes that there are 3 types of amyloid — pathological, artificial, and functional, and that the pathological amyloids are the most stable. The most stable amyloids are the pathological ones.  Why this should be so will be the subject of a future post, but accept it as fact for now

In 2007 there were 7 mutations associated with familial Alzheimer’s disease (10 years later there were 11). Here are 5 of them.

Glutamic Acid at 22 to Glycine (Arctic)

Glutamic Acid at 22 to Glutamine (Dutch)

Glutamic Acid at 22 to Lysine (Italian)

Aspartic Acid at 23 to Asparagine (Iowa)

Alanine at 21 to Glycine (Flemish)

All of them lower the energy of the amyloid fiber.

Here’s why

Glutamic Acid at 22 to Glycine (Arctic) — glycine is the smallest amino acid (side chain hydrogen) so this relieves crowding.  It also removes a negatively charged amino acid next to the aspartic acid.  Both lower the energy

Glutamic Acid at 22 to Glutamine (Dutch) — really no change in crowding, but it removes a negative charge next to the negatively charged Aspartic acid

Glutamic Acid at 22 to Lysine (Italian)– no change in crowding, but the lysine is positively charged at physiologic pH, so we have a positive charge next to the negatively charged Aspartic acid, lowering the energy

Aspartic Acid at 23 to Asparagine (Iowa) –really no change in crowding, but it removes a negative charge next to the negatively charged Glutamic acid next door

Alanine at 21 to Glycine (Flemish) — no change in charge, but a reduction in crowding as alanine has a methyl group and glycine a hydrogen.

As a chemist, I find this immensely satisfying.  The structure explains why the mutations in the 42 amino acid aBeta peptide are where they are, and the chemistry explains why the mutations are what they are.

, , , , , , , . No

Kinetic traps and life

“It is well known that the thermodynamically stable state of proteins in a crowded environment is insoluble fibrils” [ Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. vol. 119 pp. e2122078119 ’22 ].  However even under ideal conditions the time scale for their formation is hours to days [ Nat. Rev. Mol. Cell Biol. 15, 384–396 (2014) ].  Hopefully it’s even longer (decades) for senile plaques (abeta) neurofibrils (tau) and Lewy bodies (alpha-synuclein) to form.  The fact that equilibrium takes such a long time to reach, allows rapid synthesis and degradation of proteins to avoid their aggregation.  So we live because our proteins are trapped in a less the equilibrium (metastable) state by kinetics — e.g. a kinetic trap.

Amyloid Structure at Last ! 3 The Alzheimer mutations

The structure of the amyloid fibril formed by the aBeta42 peptide exactly shows why certain mutations are associated with hereditary Alzheimer’s disease.   Here is a picture

https://www.alzforum.org/news/research-news/danger-s-bends-new-structure-av42-fibrils-comes-view

Scroll down to the picture above “Bonds that Tie”

If you need some refreshing on the general structure of amyloid, have a look at the first post in the series — https://luysii.wordpress.com/2021/10/11/amyloid-structure-at-last/

Recall that in amyloid fibrils the peptide backbone is flat as a flounder (well in a box 4.8 Angstroms high) with the amino acid side chains confined to this plane.  The backbone winds around in this plane like a snake.  The area in the leftmost loop is particularly crowded with bulky side chains of glutamic acid (single letter E) at position 22 and aspartic acid (single letter D) at position 23 crowding each other.  If that wasn’t enough, at the physiologic pH of 7 both acids are ionized, hence negatively charged.  Putting two negative charges next to each other costs energy and makes the sheet making up the fibril less stable.

The marvelous paper (the source for much of this) Cell vol. 184 pp. 4857 – 4873 ’21 notes that there are 3 types of amyloid — pathological, artificial, and functional, and that the pathological amyloids are the most stable. The most stable amyloids are the pathological ones.  Why this should be so will be the subject of a future post, but accept it as fact for now

In 2007 there were 7 mutations associated with familial Alzheimer’s disease (10 years later there were 11). Here are 5 of them.

Glutamic Acid at 22 to Glycine (Arctic)

Glutamic Acid at 22 to Glutamine (Dutch)

Glutamic Acid at 22 to Lysine (Italian)

Aspartic Acid at 23 to Asparagine (Iowa)

Alanine at 21 to Glycine (Flemish)

All of them lower the energy of the amyloid fiber.

Here’s why

Glutamic Acid at 22 to Glycine (Arctic) — glycine is the smallest amino acid (side chain hydrogen) so this relieves crowding.  It also removes a negatively charged amino acid next to the aspartic acid.  Both lower the energy

Glutamic Acid at 22 to Glutamine (Dutch) — really no change in crowding, but it removes a negative charge next to the negatively charged Aspartic acid

Glutamic Acid at 22 to Lysine (Italian)– no change in crowding, but the lysine is positively charged at physiologic pH, so we have a positive charge next to the negatively charged Aspartic acid, lowering the energy

Aspartic Acid at 23 to Asparagine (Iowa) –really no change in crowding, but it removes a negative charge next to the negatively charged Glutamic acid next door

Alanine at 21 to Glycine (Flemish) — no change in charge, but a reduction in crowding as alanine has a methyl group and glycine a hydrogen.

As a chemist, I find this immensely satisfying.  The structure explains why the mutations in the 42 amino acid aBeta peptide are where they are, and the chemistry explains why the mutations are what they are.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Maybe the senile plaque really is a tombstone

“Thinking about pathologic changes in neurologic disease has been simplistic in the extreme.  Intially both senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles were assumed to be causative for Alzheimer’s.  However there are 3 possible explanations for any microscopic change seen in any disease.  The first is that they are causative (the initial assumption).  The second is that they are a pile of spent bullets, which the neuron uses to defend itself against the real killer.  The third is they are tombstones, the final emanations of a dying cell.” I’ve thought this way for years, and the quote is from 2012: https://luysii.wordpress.com/2012/07/26/research-on-alzheimers-disease-the-bad-news-the-good-news/.

We now have some evidence that the senile plaque may be just a tombstone marking a dead neuron. Certainly attempts to remove the plaques haven’t helped patients despite billions spent in the attempt.

A recent paper [ Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. vol. 117 pp. 28625–28631 ’20 –https://www.pnas.org/content/pnas/117/46/28625.full.pdf ] not only provides a new way to look at Alzheimer’s disease, but immediately suggests (to me at least) a way to test the idea. If the test proves correct, it will turn the focus of Alzheimer disease research on its ear.

Not to leave anyone behind, the senile plaque is largely made of a small fragment (the aBeta peptide 40 or 42 amino acids) from a much larger protein (the amyloid precursor protein [ APP ] — with well over 800 amino acids). Mutations in APP with the net effect of producing more aBeta are associated with familial Alzheimer’s disease, as are mutations in the enzymes chopping up APP to form Abeta (presenilin1, etc.).

The paper summarizes some evidence that the real culprit is neuronal uptake of the Abeta peptide either as a monomer, or a collection of monomers (an oligomer) or even the large aggregate of monomers seen under the microscope as the senile plaque.

The paper gives clear evidence that a 30 amino acid fragment of Abeta by itself without oligomerization can be taken up by neurons. Not only that but they found the protein on neuronal cell surface that Abeta binds to as well.

Ready to be shocked?

The protein taking Abeta into the neuron is the prion protein (PrPC) which can cause mad cow disease, wasting disease of elk and all sorts of horrible neurologic diseases among them Jakob Creutzfeldt disease.

Now to explain a bit of the jargon which follows. The amino acids making up our proteins come in two forms which are mirror images of each other. All our amino acids are of the L form, but the authors were able to synthesize the 42 amino acid Abeta peptide (Abeta42 below) using all L or all D amino acids.

It’s time to let the authors speak for themselves.

“In previous experiments we compared toxicity of L- and D-Aβ42. We found that, under conditions where L-Aβ42 reduced cell viability over 50%, D-Aβ42 was either nontoxic (PC12) or under 20% toxic . We later showed that L-Aβ is taken up approximately fivefold more efficiently than D-Aβ (28), suggesting that neuronal Aβ uptake and toxicity are linked.”

Well, if so, then the plaque is the tombstone of a neuron which took up too much Abeta.

Well how could you prove this? Any thoughts?

Cell models are nice, but animal models are probably better (although they’ve never resulted in useful therapy for stroke despite decades of trying).

Enter the 5xFAD mouse — it was engineered to have 3 mutations in APP known to cause Familial Alzheimer’s Disease + 2 more in Presenilin1 (which also cause FAD). The poor mouse starts getting Abeta deposition in its brain under two months of age (mice live about two years).

Now people aren’t really sure just what the prion protein (PrPC) actually does, and mice have been made without it (knockout mice). They are viable and fertile, and initially appear normal, but abnormalities appear as the mouse ages if you look hard enough. But still . . .

So what?

Now either knock out the PrPC gene in the 5xFAD mouse or mate the two different mouse strains.

The genes (APP, presenilin1 and PrPC) are on different chromosomes (#21, #14 and #20 respectively). So the first generation (F1) will have a normal counterpart of each of the 3 genes, along with a pathologic gene (e.g. they will be heterozygous for the 3 genes).

When members of F1 are bred with each other we’d expect some of them to have all mutant genes. If it were only 2 genes on two chromosomes, we’d expect 25% of he offspring (F2 generation) to have all abnormal genes. I’ll leave it for the mathematically inclined to figure out what the actual percentage of homozygous abnormal for all 3 would be).

What’s the point? Well, it’s easy to measure just what genes a mouse is carrying, so it’s time to look at mice with a full complement of 5xFAD genes and no PrPC.

If these mice don’t have any plaques in their brains, it’s game, set and match. Alzheimer research will shift from ways to remove the senile plaque, to ways to prevent it by inhibiting cellular uptake of the abeta peptide.

What could go wrong? Well, their could be other mechanisms and other proteins involved in getting Abeta into cells, but these could be attacked as well.

If the experiment shows what it might, this would be the best Thanksgiving present I could imagine.

So go to it. I’m an 80+ year old retired neurologist with no academic affiliation. I’d love to see someone try it.

Barking up the wrong therapeutic tree in Alzheimer’s disease

Billions have been spent by big pharma (and lost) trying to get rid of the senile plaque of Alzheimer’s disease.  The assumption has always been that the plaque is the smoking gun killing neurons.  But it’s just an assumption which a recent paper has turned on its ear [ Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. vol. 116 23040 – 23049 ’19 ]

It involves a protein, likely to be a new face even to Alzheimer’s cognoscenti.  The protein is called SERF1A (in man) and MOAG-4 in yeast. It enhances amyloid formation, the major component of the senile plaque.  SERF1A is clearly doing something important as it has changed little from the humble single yeast cell to man.

The major component of the senile plaque is the aBeta peptide of 40 and/or 42 amino acids.  It polymerizes to form the amyloid of the plaque.  The initial step of amyloid formation is the hardest, getting a bunch of Abeta peptides into the right conformation (e.g. the nucleus) so others can latch on to it and form the amyloid fiber.   It is likely that the monomers and oligomers of Abeta are what is killing neurons, not the plaques, otherwise why would natural selection/evolution keep SERF1A around?

So, billions of dollars later, getting rid of the senile plaque turns out to be a bad idea. What we want to do is increase SERF1A activity, to sop up the monomers and oligomers. It is a 180 degree shift in our thinking. That’s the executive summary, now for the fascinating chemistry involved.

First the structure of SERF1A — that is to say its amino acid sequence.  (For the nonChemists — proteins are linear string of amino acids, just as a word is a linear string of characters — the order is quite important — just as united and untied mean two very different things). There are only 68 amino acids in SERF1A of which 14 are lysine 9 are arginine 5 Glutamic acid and 5 Aspartic acid.  That’s interesting in itself, as we have 20 different amino acids, and if they occurred randomly you’d expect about 3 -4 of each.  The mathematicians among you should enjoy figuring out just how improbable this compared to random assortment. So just four amino acids account for 33 of the 68 in SERF1A  Even more interesting is the fact that all 4 are charged at body pH — lysine and arginine are positively charged because their nitrogen picks up protons, and glutamic and aspartic acid are negatively charged  giving up the proton.

This means that positive and negative can bind to each other (something energetically quite favorable).  How many ways are there for the 10 acids to bind to the 23 bases?  Just 23 x 22 x 21 X 20 X 19 X 18 x 17 x 16 x 15 x 14 or roughly 20^10 ways.  This means that SERF1A doesn’t have a single structure, but many of them.  It is basically a disordered protein.

The paper shows exactly this, that several conformations of SERF1 are seen in solution, and that it binds to Abeta forming a ‘fuzzy complex’, in which the number of Abetas and SERF1s are not fixed — e.g. there is no fixed stoichiometry — something chemists are going to have to learn to deal with — see — https://luysii.wordpress.com/2018/12/16/bye-bye-stoichiometry/.  Also different conformations of SERF1A are present in the fuzzy complex, explaining why it has such a peculiar amino acid composition.  Clever no?  Let’s hear it for the blind watchmaker or whatever you want to call it.

The paper shows that SERF1 increases the rate at which Abeta forms the nucleus of the amyloid fiber.  It does not help the fiber grow.  This means that the fiber is good and the monomers and oligomers are bad.  Not only that but SERF1 has exactly the same effect with alpha-synuclein, the main protein of the Lewy body of Parkinsonism.

So the paper represents a huge paradigm shift in our understanding of the cause of at least 2 bad neurological diseases.   Even more importantly, the paper suggests a completely new way to attack them.

How to treat Alzheimer’s disease

Let’s say you’re an engineer whose wife has early Alzheimer’s disease.  Would you build the following noninvasive device to remove her plaques?  [ Cell vol. 177 pp. 256 – 271 ’19 ] showed that it worked in mice.

Addendum 18 April — A reader requested a better way to get to the paper — Here is the title — “Multisensory Gamma Stimulation Ameliorates Alzheimer’s Associated Pathology and Improves Cognition”.  It is from MIT — here is the person to correspond to  —Correspondence — lhtsai@mit.edu

The device emits sound and light 40 times a second.  Exposing mice  to this 1 hour a day for a week decreased the number of senile plaques all over the brain (not just in the auditory and visual cortex) and improved their cognition as well.

With apologies to Steinbeck, mice are not men (particularly these mice which carry 5 different mutations which cause Alzheimer’s disease in man).  Animal cognition is not human cognition.  How well do you think Einstein would have done running a maze looking for food?

I had written about the authors’ earlier work and a copy of that post will be found after the ****.

What makes this work exciting is that plaque reduction was seen not only  in the visual cortex (which is pretty much unaffected in Alzheimer’s) but in the hippocampus (which is devastated) and the frontal lobes (also severely affected).  Interestingly, to be effective, both sound and light had to be given simultaneously

Here are the details about the stimuli  —

“Animals were presented with 10 s stimulation blocks interleaved with 10 s baseline periods. Stimulation blocks rotated between auditory-only or auditory and visual stimulation at 20 Hz, 40 Hz, 80 Hz, or with random stimulation (pulses were delivered with randomized inter-pulse intervals determined from a uniform distribution with an average interval of 25 ms). Stimuli blocks were interleaved to ensure the results observed were not due to changes over time in the neuronal response. 10 s long stimulus blocks were used to reduce the influence of onset effects, and to examine neural responses to prolonged rhythmic stimulation. All auditory pulses were 1 ms-long 10 kHz tones. All visual pulses were 50% duty cycle of the stimulation frequency (25 ms, 12.5 ms, or 6.25 ms in length). For combined stimulation, auditory and visual pulses were aligned to the onset of each pulse.”

The device should not require approval by the FDA unless a therapeutic claim is made, and it’s about as noninvasive as it could be.

What could go wrong?  Well a flickering light could trigger seizures in people subject to photic epilepsy (under 1/1,000).

Certainly Claude Shannon who died of Alzheimer’s disease, would have had one built, as would Fields medal winner Daniel Quillen had he not passed away 8 years ago.

Here is the post of 12/16 which has more detail

 

*****

Will flickering light treat Alzheimer’s disease ?

Big pharma has spent zillions trying to rid the brain of senile plaques, to no avail. A recent paper shows that light flickering at 40 cycles/second (40 Hertz) can do it — this is not a misprint [ Nature vol. 540 pp. 207 – 208, 230 – 235 ’16 ]. As most know the main component of the senile plaque of Alzheimer’s disease is a fragment (called the aBeta peptide) of the amyloid precursor protein (APP).

The most interesting part of the paper showed that just an hour or so of light flickering at 40 Hertz temporarily reduced the amount of Abeta peptide in visual cortex of aged mice. Nothing invasive about that.

Should we try this in people? How harmful could it be? Unfortunately the visual cortex is relatively unaffected in Alzheimer’s disease — the disease starts deep inside the head in the medial temporal lobe, particularly the hippocampus — the link shows just how deep it is -https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hippocampus#/media/File:MRI_Location_Hippocampus_up..png

You might be able to do this through the squamous portion of the temporal bone which is just in front of and above the ear. It’s very thin, and ultrasound probes placed here can ‘see’ blood flowing in arteries in this region. Another way to do it might be a light source placed in the mouth.

The technical aspects of the paper are fascinating and will be described later.

First, what could go wrong?

The work shows that the flickering light activates the scavenger cells of the brain (microglia) and then eat the extracellular plaques. However that may not be a good thing as microglia could attack normal cells. In particular they are important in the remodeling of the dendritic tree (notably dendritic spines) that occurs during experience and learning.

Second, why wouldn’t it work? So much has been spent on trying to remove abeta, that serious doubt exists as to whether excessive extracellular Abeta causes Alzheimer’s and even if it does, would removing it be helpful.

Now for some fascinating detail on the paper (for the cognoscenti)

They used a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease (the 5XFAD mouse). This poor creature has 3 different mutations associated with Alzheimer’s disease in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) — these are the Swedish (K670B), Florida (I716V) and London (V717I). If that wasn’t enough there are two Alzheimer associated mutations in one of the enzymes that processes the APP into Abeta (M146L, L286V) — using the single letter amino acid code –http://www.biochem.ucl.ac.uk/bsm/dbbrowser/c32/aacode.html.hy1. Then the whole mess is put under control of a promoter particularly active in mice (the Thy1 promoter). This results in high expression of the two mutant proteins.

So the poor mice get lots of senile plaques (particularly in the hippocampus) at an early age.

The first experiment was even more complicated, as a way was found to put channelrhodopsin into a set of hippocampal interneurons (this is optogenetics and hardly simple). Exposing the channel to light causes it to open the membrane to depolarize and the neuron to fire. Then fiberoptics were used to stimulate these neurons at 40 Hertz and the effects on the plaques were noted. Clearly a lot of work and the authors (and grad students) deserve our thanks.

Light at 8 Hertz did nothing to the plaques. I couldn’t find what other stimulation frequencies were used (assuming they were tried).

It would be wonderful if something so simple could help these people.

For other ideas about Alzheimer’s using physics rather than chemistry please see — https://luysii.wordpress.com/2014/11/30/could-alzheimers-disease-be-a-problem-in-physics-rather-than-chemistry/

Does gamma-secretase have sex with its substrates?

This is a family blog (for the most part), so discretion is advised in reading further.   Billions have been spent trying to inhibit gamma-secretase.  Over 150 different mutations have been associated with familial Alzheimer’s disease.  The more we know about the way it works, the better.

A recent very impressive paper from China did just that [ Science vol. 363 pp. 690- 691, 701 eaaw0930 pp. 1 –> 8 ’19 ].

Gamma secretase is actually a combination of 4 proteins (presenilin1, nicastrin, APH1 (anterior pharynx defect) and PEN-2 (presenilin enhancer 2). It is embedded in membranes and has at least 19 transmembrane segments.  It cleaves a variety of proteins spanning membranes (e.g it hydrolyzes a peptide bond — which is just an amide).  The big deal is that cleavage occurs in the hydrophobic interior of the membrane rather than in the cytoplasm where there is plenty of water around.

Gamma secretase cleaves at least 20 different proteins this way, not just the amyloid precursor protein, one of whose cleavage products is the Abeta peptide making up a large component of the senile plaque of Alzheimer’s disease.

To get near gamma secretase, another enzyme must first cleave APP in another place so one extramembrane fragment is short.  Why so the rest of the protein can fit under a loop between two transmembrane helices of nicastrin.  This is elegance itself, so the gamma secretase doesn’t go around chopping up the myriad of extracellular proteins we have.

The 19 or so transmembrane helices of the 4 gamma secretase proteins form a horseshoe, into which migrates the transmembrane segment of the protein to be cleaved (once it can fit under the nicastrin loop).

So why is discretion advised before reading further?  Because the actual mechanism of cleavage involves intimate coupling of the proteins.    One of the transmembrane helices of presenilin1 unfolds to form two beta strands, and the transmembrane helix of the target protein unfolds to form one beta strand, the two strands pair up forming a beta sheet, and then the aspartic acid at the active site of gamma secretase cleaves the target (deflowers it if you will).  Is this sexual or what?

All in all another tribute to ingenuity (and possibly the prurience) of the blind watchmaker. What an elegant mechanism.

Have a look at the pictures in the Science article, but I think it is under a paywall.

Will acyclovir be a treatment for Alzheimer’s ?

When I was a first year medical student my aunt died of probable acute herpes simplex encephalitis at Columbia University Hospital in New York City.  That was 55 years ago and her daughters (teenagers at the time) still bear the scars.  Later, as a neurologist I treated it, and after 1977, when acyclovir, which effectively treats herpes encephalitis came out, I would always wonder if acyclovir would have saved her.

The drug is simplicity itself.  It’s just guanosine (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guanosine) with two of the carbons of the ribose missing.  Herpesviruses have an enzyme which forms the triphosphate incorporating it into its DNA killing the virus.  Well, actually we have the same enzyme, but the virus’s enzyme is 3,000,000 times more efficient than ours, so acyclovir is relatively nontoxic to us.  People with compromised renal function shouldn’t take it.

What does this have to do with Alzheimer’s disease?  The senile plaque of Alzheimers is mostly the aBeta peptide (39 – 43 amino acids) from the amyloid precursor protein (APP).  This has been known for years, and my notes on various papers about over the years contain 150,000 characters or so.

Even so, there’s a lot we don’t understand about APP and the abeta peptide — e.g. what are they doing for us?  You can knockout the APP gene in mice and they appear normal and fertile.  The paper cited below notes that APP has been present in various species for the past 400,000,000 years of evolutionary time remaining pretty much unchanged throughout, so it is probably doing something useful

A recent paper in Neuron (vol. 99 pp. 56 – 63 ’18) noted that aBeta is actually an antimicrobial peptide.  When exposed to herpes simplex it binds to glycoproteins on its surface and then  oligomerizes forming amyloid (just like in the senile plaque) trapping the virus.  Abeta will protect mice against herpes simplex 1 (HSV1) encephalitis.  Even more important — infection of the mice with HSV1 induced abeta production in their brains.

People have been claiming infections as the cause of just about every neurodegeneration since I’ve been a neurologist, and papers have been written about HSV1 and Alzheimer’s.

Which brings me to the second paper (ibid. pp. 64 – 82) that looked for the viral RNAs and DNAs in over 900 or so brains, some with and some without Alzheimer’s.  They didn’t find HSV but they found two other herpes viruses known to infect man (HHV6, HHV7 — which cause roseola infantum).  Humans are subject to infection with 8 different herpes virus (Epstein Barr — mononucleosis, H. Zoster — chickenpox etc. etc.).   Just about everyone of us has herpes virus in latent form in the trigeminal ganglion — which gets sensory information from our faces.

So could some sort of indolent herpesvirus infection be triggering abeta peptide production as a defense with the senile plaque as a byproduct?  That being the case, given the minimal benefits of any therapy we have for Alzheimer’s disease so far, why not try acyclovir (Zovirax) on Alzheimer’s.

I find it remarkable that neither paper mentioned this possibility, or even discussed any of the antivirals active against herpesviruses.

Abeta raises its head again

Billions have been spent (and lost) by big Pharma on attempts to decrease Abeta peptide in the brain as a therapy for Alzheimer’s. Yet the theory that Abeta has something to do with Alzheimer’s won’t die because it is so compelling.

Here’s another example [Neuron vol. 96 pp. 355 – 372 ’17 ] Neurons in hippocampal slices stop forming new synapses when exposed to Abeta.  We think that synapse formation and elimination is going on all the time in our brains — it certainly is in mice.  For details see an excellent review [ Neuron vol. 96 pp. 43 – 55 ’17 ].  This is thought to be important in learning, something lost in Alzheimer’s as well as old memories. Two Alzheimer mouse models have shown defects in new synaptic spine formation.

Even better the authors found what Abeta is binding to — a well known brain protein — Nogo receptor 1 (Ngr1).  When it was knocked down in the slice (by bolistic short hairpin RNA infererence — shRNAi), spines started reforming.

So the work may explain some of the problems in Alzheimer’s disease but it says nothing about the neuronal loss which is also found.

Also, there is something fishy about the results.  The Abeta preparation used in the experiment was mostly oligomers of about 100 monomers (with a molecular mass of 500 kiloDaltons).  Monomers had no effect.  It is much easier to conceptualize a monomer binding to a receptor than an oligomer.  However, oligomer binding would tend to cluster receptors, something important in immune responses.

The strongest evidence for Abeta in my opinion is the fact that certain mutations PROTECT against Alzheimer’s — and given the structure just worked out we have a plausible explanation of just how this works — for details see — https://luysii.wordpress.com/2017/10/12/abeta42-at-last/

 

Abeta42 at last

It’s easy to see why cryoEM got the latest chemistry Nobel.  It is telling us so much.  Particularly fascinating to me as a retired neurologist is the structure of the Abeta42 fibril reported in last Friday’s Science (vol. 358 pp. 116 – 119 ’17).  

Caveats first.  The materials were prepared using an aqueous solution at low pH containing an organic cosolvent — so how physiologic could the structure actually be?  It probably is physiologic as the neurotoxicity of the fibrils to neurons in culture was the same as fibrils grown at neutral pH.  This still isn’t the same as fibrils grown in the messy concentrated chemical soup known as the cytoplasm.  Tending to confirm their findings is the fact that NMR and Xray diffraction on the crystals produced the same result.

The fibrils were unbranched and microns long (implying at least 2,000 layers of the beta sheets to be described).  The beta sheets stack in parallel and in register giving the classic crossBeta sheet structure.  They were made of two protofilaments winding around each other.  Each protofilament contains all 42 amino acids of Abeta42 and all of them form a completely flat beta sheet structure.

Feast your eyes on figure 2 p. 117.  In addition to showing the two beta sheets of the two protofilaments, it shows how they bind to each other.  Aspartic acid #1 of one sheet binds to lysine #28 of the other.  Otherwise the interface is quite hydrophobic.  Alanine2 of one sheet binds to alanine42 of the other, valine39 of one sheet binds to valine 39 of the other.  Most importantly isoLeucine 41 of one sheet binds to glycine38 of the other.

This is important since the difference between the less toxic Abeta40 and the toxic Abeta 42 are two hydrophobic amino acids Isoleucine 41 and Alanine 42.  This makes for a tighter, longer, more hydrophobic interface between the protofilaments stabilizing them.

That’s just a guess.  I can’t wait for work on Abeta40 to be reported at this resolution.

A few other points.  The beta sheet of each protomer is quite planar, but the planes of the two protomers are tilted by 10 degrees accounting for the helicity of the fibril. The fibril is a rhombus whose longest edge is about 70 Angstroms.

Even better the structure explains a mutation which is protective against Alzheimer’s.  This remains the strongest evidence (to me at least) that Abeta peptides are significantly involved in Alzheimer’s disease, therapeutic failures based on this idea notwithstanding.  The mutation is a change of alanine2 to threonine which can’t possibly snuggle up hydrophobically to isoleucine nearly as well as alanine did. This should significantly weaken the link between the two protofilaments and make fibril formation more difficult.

The Abeta structure of the paper also explains another mutation. This one increases the risk of Alzheimer’s disease (like many others which have been discovered).  It involves the same amino acid (alanine2) but this time it is changed to the more hydrophobic valine, probably resulting in a stronger hydrophobic interaction with isoLeucine41 (assuming that valine’s greater bulk doesn’t get in the way sterically).

Wonderful stuff to think and speculate about, now that we actually have some solid data to chew on.