Tag Archives: LTD

Why drug development is hard #31: retroviruses at the synapse

What if I told you that a very important neuronal synaptic protein Arc (Arg3.1) is acting like like a virus, sending copies of itself (and its messenger RNA) across the synapse?  Would a team of shrinks, who’ve never examined me, tell you that I was crazy and unfit to blog?  Well there is very good evidence that exactly this occurs in one situation and probably many more [ Cell vol. 172 pp. 8 – 10, 262 – 274, 275 – 288 ’18] — http://www.cell.com/cell/fulltext/S0092-8674(17)31509-X.

Arc stands for Activity Regulated Cytoskeleton associated protein.  It’s messenger RNA (mRNA) is transcribed from the gene in response to neuronal activity.  More importantly, the mRNA for  Arc is rapidly distributed to active synapses through the cell body and dendrites, where it is translated into protein. It is locally and rapidly stimulated during the induction of long term depression and plays a critical role in removing a class of glutamic acid receptors (AMPA receptors) from the synapse.  To whet the interest of drug developers, Arc regulates the activity dependent cleavage of the Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) and beta amyloid production by its interaction with presenilin

Several posts could easily be filled with what Arc does, but that’s not what is so amazing about these papers.  Parts of the Arc protein arose from one of the many transcriptionally dead retroviruses found in our genome.  Our species literally wouldn’t exist without other retroviral gifts.  For instance syncytin1 is a protein expressed a high levels in the placenta.  It is produced from the envelope gene of an endogenous retrovirus (HERV-W) which has undergon inactivating mutations in its other major genes (gag and pol).  Mutant mice in which the gene has been knocked out die in utero due to failure of placenta formation.

Part of the arc gene arose from the Gag gene (Group specific antigen gene) of a retrovirus.  Recall most viruses have proteins coating their genetic material when they’re on the move (e. g. a capsid).  In the case of retroviruses, the genetic material is RNA rather than DNA.  Well the gag elements of the Arc protein form a capsid containing the mRNA for Arc (just like a virus).  In some way or other the capsid containing mRNA gets outside the neuron at the nerve muscle junction and gets into muscle.  The evidence is good that this happens, but in a system somewhat removed from us — the fruitfly (Drosophila).  Fruitfly neuromuscular junctions lacking this mechanism are weaker.

Well that’s pretty far from us.  However one of the papers (275 – 288) showed that the Arc protein and its mRNA was found in extracellular vesicles released from mouse neurons cultured from their cerebral cortex.  Could viral-like particles be crossing the synapses in our brains (which are already pretty chockfull of stuff — see https://luysii.wordpress.com/2017/11/15/the-bouillabaisse-of-the-synaptic-cleft/).  It’s very early times (in fact the Cell issue came out 3 days ago) but people are sure to look.  There are at least 100 Gag derived genes in the human genome (Campillos, M., Doerks, T., Shah, P.K., and Bork, P. (2006). Computational characterization of multiple Gag-like human proteins. Trends Genet. 22, 585–589.).

Remarkable.  Remember CRISPR was hiding in plain sight for half a century.  We have a lot to learn.  No wonder drugs have unexpected side effects.

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Are you sure you know everything your protein is up to?

Just because you know one function of a protein doesn’t mean you know them all. A recent excellent review of the (drumroll) executioner caspases [ Neuron vol. 88 pp. 461 – 474 ’15 ] brings this to mind. Caspases control a form of cell death called apoptosis, in which a cell goes gently into the good night without causing a fuss (particularly inflammation and alerting the immune system that something bad killed it). They are enzymes which chop up other proteins and cause the activation of other proteins which chop up DNA. They cause the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane to expose itself (particularly phosphatidyl serine which tells nearby scavenger cells to ‘eat me’).

The answer to the mathematical puzzle in the previous post will be found at the end of this one.

In addition to containing an excellent review of the various steps turning caspases on and off, the review talks about all the things activated caspases do in the nervous system without killing the neuron containing them. Among them are neurite outgrowth and regeneration of peripheral nerve axons after transection. Well that’s pathology, but one executioner caspase (caspase3) is involved in the millisecond to millisecond functioning of the nervous system — e.g. long term depression of neurons (LTD), something quite important to learning.

Of course, such potentially lethal activity must be under tight control, and there are 8 inhibitors of apoptosis (IAPs) of which 3 bind the executioners. We also have inhibitors of IAPs (SMAC, HTRA2) — wheels within wheels.

Are there any other examples where a protein discovered by one of its functions turns out to have others. Absolutely. One example is cytochrome c, which was found as it shuttles electrons to complex IVin the electron transport chain of mitochondria.Certainly a crucial function. However, when the mitochondria stops functioning either because it is told to or something bad happens, cytochrome c is released from mitochondria into the cytoplasm where it then activates caspase3, one of the executioner caspases.

Here’s another. Enzymes which hook amino acids onto tRNA are called tRNA synthases (aaRs for some reason). However one of the (called EPRS) when phosphorylated due to interferon gamma activity, became part of a complex of proteins which silences specific genes (translation — stops the gene from being transcribed) involved in the inflammatory response.

Yet another tRNA synthase, when released from the cell triggers an inflammatory response.

Naturally molecular biologists have invented a fancy word for the process of evolving a completely different function for a molecule — exaptation (to contrast it with adaptation).

Note the word molecule — exaptation isn’t confined to proteins. [ Cell vol. 160 pp. 554 – 566 ’15 ] Discusses exaptation as something which happens to promoters and enhancers. This work looked at the promoters and enhancers active in the liver in 20 mammalian species — all the enhancers were rapidly evolving.

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Answer to the mathematical puzzle of the previous post. R is the set of 4 straight lines bounding a square centered at (0,0)

Here’s why proving it has an inside and an outside isn’t enough to prove the Jordan Curve Theorem

No. The argument for R uses its geometry (the boundary is made of straight
line segments). The problem is that an embedding f: S^1 -> R^2 may be
convoluted, say something of the the Hilbert curve sort.