Tag Archives: Ketamine

The four hour cure for depression: what is Ketamine doing?

It is a sad state of affairs when you look forward to writing a post on depression.

https://www.fox32chicago.com/news/79-shot-15-fatally-over-fourth-of-july-weekend-in-chicago

https://www.straitstimes.com/asia/south-asia/indian-grooms-wedding-funeral-leave-more-than-100-infected-with-coronavirus

From Nature 2 July — “G4 a type of swine flu virus from China can proliferate in human airway cells.  34/338 pig farm workers in China have antibodies to it.  In ferrets G4 causes lung inflammation and coughing.”

Well that’s enough reason to flee to the solace of the basic neuroscience of depression.

 

 

The drugs we use for depression aren’t great.  They don’t help at least a third of the patients, and they usually take several weeks to work for endogenous depression.  They seemed to work faster in my MS patients who had a relapse and were quite naturally depressed by an exogenous event completely out of their control.

Enter Ketamine which, when given IV, can transiently lift depression within a few hours.  You can find more details and references in an article in  Neuron ( vol. 101 pp. 774 – 778 ’19)  written by the guys at Yale who did some of the original work. However, here’s the gist of the article.  A single dose of ketamine produced antidepressant effects that began within hours peaked in 24 – 72 hours and dissipated within 2 weeks (if ketamine wasn’t repeated).  This occurred in 50 – 75% of people with treatment resistant depression.  Remarkably one third of treated patients went into remission.

This simply has to be telling us something very important about the neurochemistry of depression.

Naturally there has been a lot of work on the neurochemical changes produced by ketamine, none of which I’ve found convincing ( see https://luysii.wordpress.com/2019/10/27/how-does-ketamine-lift-depression/ ) until the following paper [ Neuron  vol. 106 pp. 715 – 726 ’20 ].

In what follows you have to have some basic knowledge of synaptic structure, but here’s a probably inadequate elevator pitch.  Synapses have two sides, pre- and post-.  On the presynaptic side neurotransmitters are enclosed in synaptic vesicles.  Their contents are released into the synaptic cleft when an action potential arrives from elsewhere in the neuron.  The neurotransmitters flow across the very narrow synapse to bind to receptors on the postsynaptic side, triggering (or not) a response of the postsynaptic neuron.  Presynaptic terminals vary in the number vesicles they contain.

Synapses are able to change their strength (how likely an action potential is to produce a postsynaptic response).  Otherwise our brains wouldn’t be able to change and learn anything.  This is called synaptic plasticity.

One way to change the strength of a synapse is to adjust the number of synaptic vesicles found on the presynaptic side.   Presynaptic neurons form synapses with many different neurons.  The average neuron in the cerebral cortex is post-synaptic to thousands of neurons.

We think that synaptic plasticity involves changes at particular synapses but not at all of them.

Not so with ketamine according to the paper.  It changes the number of presynaptic vesicles at all synapses of a given neuron by the same percentage — this is called synaptic scaling.  Given 3 synapses containing 60  50 and 40 vesicles, upward synaptic scaling by 20% would add 12 vesicles to the first 10 to the second and 8 to the third.   The paper states that this is exactly what ketamine does to neurons using glutamic acid (the major excitatory neurotransmitter found in brain).  Even more interesting, is the fact that lithium which treats mania has the opposite effects decreasing the number of vesicles in each synapse by the same percentage.

I found this rather depressing when I first read it, as I realized that there was no chemical process intrinsic to a neuron which could possibly work quickly enough to change all the synapses at once.  To do this you need a drug which goes everywhere at once.

But you don’t. There are certain brain nuclei which send their processes everywhere in the brain.  Not only that but their processes contain varicosities which release their neurotransmitter even where there is no post-synaptic apparatus.  One such nucleus (the pars compacta of the substantia nigra) has extensively ramified processes so much so that “Individual neurons of the pars compact are calculated to give rise to 4.5 meters of axons once all the branches are summed”  — [ Neuron vol. 96 p. 651 ’17 ].  So when that single neuron fires, dopamine is likely to bathe every neuron in the brain.  We think that something similar occurs in the locus coeruleus of the lower brain which has only 15,000 neurons and releases norepinephrine, and also in the raphe nuclei of the brainstem which release serotonin.

It should be less than a surprise that drugs which alter neurotransmission by these neurotransmitters are used to treat various psychiatric diseases.  Some drugs of abuse alter them as well (Cocaine and speed release norepinephrine, LSD binds one of the serotonin receptors etc, etc.)

The substantia nigra contains only 450,000 neurons at birth, so you don’t need a big nucleus to affect our 80 billion neuron brains.

So the question before the house, is have we missed other nuclei in the brain which control volume neurotransmission by glutamic acid?   If they exist, could their malfunction be a cause of mania and/or depression?  There is plenty of room for 10,000 to 100,000 neurons to hide in an 80 billion neuron brain.

Time to think outside the box people. Here is an example:  Since ketamine blocks activation of one receptor for glutamic acid, could there be a system using volume neurotransmission which releases a receptor inhibitor?

Addendum 7 July — I sent a copy of the post to the authors and received this back from one of them. “Thank you very much for your kind words and interest in our work. Your explanation is quite accurate (my only suggestion would be to replace “vesicles” with “receptors”, as the changes we propose are postsynaptic). Reading your blog reassures us that our review article accomplished its main goal of reaching beyond the immediate neuroscience community to a wider audience like yourself.”

 

How does ketamine lift depression?

The incredibly rapid improvement in depression (hours) produced by ketamine is unprecedented and surely is telling us something vitally important about depression.  If only we could figure out what it is.  Clinicians were used to waiting weeks for antidepressants of all sorts to work.  As a neurologist, I’d see it work in a week or so in my MS patients depressed due a relapse.

Two recent papers show just how hard it is going to be [Neuron  vol. 104 pp. 182 – 182, 338 – 352 ’19 ]. First off you have to accept the idea that even though animals (usually mice) can’t tell us how they feel, we still have reasonable animal models of depression (tail suspension test, forced swim test).  We can at least get a handle on anhedonia using the sucrose preference test.

Throw ketamine at an animal and measure the biochemical or the neurophysiologic effect of your choice. There are zillions of them.  Throw just about anything at the brain, and all sorts of things change.  The problem is showing that the change is relevant.  Is the known blockade of NMDA receptors by ketamine how it helps depression.  Give enough and you get out of body experiences and all sorts of craziness, not an antidepressant effect.

Homer1a is a protein found at the synapse, and like all scaffold proteins, it interacts with a bunch of different proteins. It links another type of glutamic acid receptor (mGluR1 and mGluR5) to inositol 1, 4, 5 trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) on the endoplasmic reticulum.  It also links mGluR1 and mGluR5 to NMDARs and other ion channels.

So what?

Other work by the authors showed that knockdown of Homer1a (using small interfering RNA – siRNA) in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) abolished the antidepressant effects (in animal models) to ketamine.  Well that’s good, but even better is that knockdown also abolished the antidepressant effects of a tricyclic antidepressant (imipramine).

The present work showed that increasing the expression of Homer1a (the protein comes in various isoforms) in the frontal cortex reduced depression in the various models.

Pretty good — all we have to do is increase Homer1a expression to have a treatment of depression.

Don’t get your hopes up, and this is why depression research is so — well depressing.

Increasing Homer1a expression in another brain region (the hippocampus) has exactly the opposite effects.

How general anesthesia works

People have been theorizing how general anesthesia works since there has been general anesthesia.  The first useful one was diethyl ether (by definition what lipids dissolve in).  Since the brain has the one of the highest fat contents of any organ, the mechanism was obvious to all.  Anesthetics dissolve membranes.  Even the newer anesthetics look quite lipophilic — isoflurane CF3CHCL O CF2H screams (to the chemist) find me a lipid to swim in.  One can show effects of lipids on artificial membranes but the concentrations to do so are so high they would be lethal.

Attention shifted to the GABA[A] receptor, because anesthetics are effective in potentiating responses to GABA  — all the benzodiazepines (valium, librium) which bind to it are sedating.  Further evidence that a protein is involved, is that the optical isomers of enflurane vary in anesthetic potency (but not by very much — only 60%).  Lipids (except cholesterol) just aren’t optically active.  Interestingly, alfaxolone is a steroid and a general anesthetic as well.

Well GABA[A] is an ion channel, meaning that its amino acids form alpha helices which span the membrane (and create a channel for ion flow).  It would be devilishly hard to distinguish binding to the transmembrane part from binding to the membrane near it. [ Science vol. 322 pp. 876 – 880 2008 ] Studied 4 IV anesthetics (propofol, ketamine, etomidate, barbiturate) and 4 gasses (nitrous  oxide, isoflurance, devoflurane, desflurane) and their effects on 11 ion channels — unsurprisingly all sorts of effects were found — but which ones are the relevant.

All this sort of stuff could be irrelevant, if a new paper is actually correct [ Neuron vol. 102 pp. 1053 – 1065 ’19 ].  The following general anesthetics (isoflurane, propofol, ketamine and desmedtomidine) all activate cells in the hypothalamus (before this anesthetics were thought to work by ultimately inhibiting neurons).  They authors call these cells AANs (Anesthesia Activated Neurons).

They are found in the hypothalamus and contain ADH.  Time for some anatomy.  The pituitary gland is really two glands — the adenohypophysis which secretes things like ACTH, TSH, FSH, LH etc. etc, and the neurohypophysis which secretes oxytocin and vasopressin (ADH) directly into the blood (and also into the spinal fluid where it can reach other parts of the brain.  ADH release is actually from the axons of the hypothalamic neurons.  The AANs activated by the anesthetics release ADH.

Of course the workers didn’t stop there — they stimulated the neurons optogenetically and put the animals to sleep. Inhibition of these neurons shortened the duration of general anesthesia.

Fascinating (if true).  The next question is how such chemically disparate molecules can activate the AANs.  Is there a common receptor for them, and if so what is it?

Happy fiscal new year !

How complicated can neuropharmacology be?

A revolution is occurring in our thinking about the neurochemistry and treatment of depression.  Spectacular therapeutic results with ketamine imply that neurotransmission with glutamic acid is involved (see the older post below for the background)  In addition gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) may also be a player.  That’s why a recent review [ Neuron vol. 102 pp. 75 – 94 ’19 ] is worth a careful reading.

Like all new fields, early results are particularly confusing. In particular the statement was made that in addition to NMDA receptor blockers (such as ketamine) positive allosteric modifiers (PAMs) of the NMDAR also are therapeutic in depression (the latter in animal models only, a phase III trial in depression having failed).

So I wrote the lead author ”

Great review, but how do you reconcile the rapid antidepressant action of the NMDAR blocker ketamine and friends and an NMDAR PAM (positive allosteric modifier)”

I got the following back —

We have data indicating that ketamine blocks NMDA receptors on GABA neurons resulting in disinhibition and increased synaptic activity of principle neurons, whereas the PAM (rapastinel) acts directly on NMDA receptors on principle neurons to produce a similar downstream effect

It didn’t make sense that drugs having opposite effects on the same therapeutic target (the NMDAR) would have the same therapeutic effect.

So I wrote

If I understand you correctly, this implies that the subunit composition of the NMDARs at the two sites (GABA interneurons and principal neurons) is different.

I got the following back, which is positively Talmudic in its logical intricacy.

It could be the same receptor complex; because ketamine is an open channel blocker the GABA neurons, which are more active, would be more sensitive because activity is required to remove the Mg+2 block in the channel and thereby allow ketamine to enter and block the channel. The PAM does not require activity and could act at directly on principle neurons.

If this is correct, a lot of neuropharmacology on drug effects will require rethinking.  What does the readership think?

Stock tip — update

The FDA approved esketamine (Spravato) last week (see copy of original post at the end).  I had recommended buying Johnson and Johnson if the FDA approved it.  I think it’s a good long term buy, but there is no rush for the following reason — Esketamine is not a drug you can get a prescription for and take on you own. Because of the psychiatric side effects it must be administered in a SPRAVATO REMS.

Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS): SPRAVATO™ is available only through a restricted program called the SPRAVATO™ REMS because of the risks of serious adverse outcomes from sedation, dissociation, and abuse and misuse.

Important requirements of the SPRAVATO™ REMS include the following:

  • Healthcare settings must be certified in the program and ensure that SPRAVATO™ is:
    • Only dispensed in healthcare settings and administered to patients who are enrolled in the program.
    • Administered by patients under the direct observation of a healthcare provider and that patients are monitored by a healthcare provider for at least 2 hours after administration of SPRAVATO™.
  • Pharmacies must be certified in the REMS and must only dispense SPRAVATO™ to healthcare settings that are certified in the program.

So you can’t go to some shady practitioner who’ll say you have treatment resistant depression and get some (e.g. the pill pushers for opiates, ‘medical’ marihuana  etc. etc.)

So there aren’t going to be hordes of users right away, although the stuff I’ve read implies that there will be eventually.

If you have a subscription to Cell have a look at vol. 101 pp. 774 – 778 ’19 by the guys at Yale who did some of the original work.  If not content yourself with this.

They are refreshingly honest.

Was the Discovery of Ketamine’s Antidepressant Serendipitous?Of course. However, its discovery emerged from the testing of a novel mechanistic hypothesis related to the pathophysiology of depression.”

Basically the authors rejected the regnant theory of depression, namely that the cause was to be found in monoamine neurotransmission (e.g. by dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin).  There was some evidence that the cerebral cortex was involved in depression (not just the monamine nuclei of the brainstem), so they looked at the two major neurotransmitters in brain (glutamic acid, and GABA), and chose to see what would happen if they blocked one of the many receptors for glutamic acid, the NMDA receptor.  They chose ketamine to do this.
Here’s what they found,  A single dose of ketamine produced antidepressant effects that began within hours peaked in 24 – 72 hours and dissipated within 2 weeks (if ketamine wasn’t repeated).  This was in 50 – 75% people with treatment resistant depression.  Remarkable 1/3 of treated patients went into remission.    There simply has never been anything like this, which is why I thought the drug would be a blockbuster.
There is a lot of speculation about just which effect of esketamine is crucial (increase in glutamic acid release with AMPAR stimulation, brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) release, TrkB receptor stimulation, mTORC1 activation, local protein synthesis, restoration of functional connectivity in functional MRI.   In animals one sees a rapid proliferation of dendritic spines.
As promised – here’s a copy of the first post

Stock tip

The past performance of stock recommendations is no guarantee that it will continue — which is fortunate as my first tip (ONTX) was a disaster.  I knew it was a 10 to one shot but with a 100 to 1 payoff.  People play the lottery with worse odds.  Anyway ONTX had a rationale — for the gory details see — https://luysii.wordpress.com/2016/06/01/in-a-gambling-mood/

For those brave souls who followed this recommendation (including yours truly) here’s another.

On 4 March 2019 if the FDA approves esketamine for depression, buy Johnson and Johnson.  Why?  Some people think that no drug for depression works that well, as big Pharma in the past only was reporting positive studies.  The following is from Nature 21 February 2019.

Depression drug A form of the hallucinogenic party drug ketamine has cleared one of the final hurdles towards clinical use as an antidepressant. During a 12 February meeting at the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in Silver Spring, Maryland,an independent advisory panel voted 14 to 2 in favour of recommending a compound known as esketamine for use in treating depression.

What’s so hot about esketamine?  First its mechanism of action is completely different than the SSRIs, Monoamine oxidase inhibitors, or tricyclic antidepressants.

As you likely know, antidepressants usually take a few weeks to work at least in endogenous depression.  My clinical experience as a neurologist is slightly different, as I only used it for patients with disease I couldn’t help (end stage MS etc. etc.) where the only normal response to the situation was depression.  They often helped patients within a week.

I was staggered when I read the following paper back in the day.  But there was no followup essentially.

archives of general psychiatry volume 63 pp. 856 – 864 2006
The paper is not from St. Fraudulosa Hospital in Plok Tic, but from the Mood Disorders Research Unit at the National Institute of Mental Health.
Here are the basics from the paper

Patients  Eighteen subjects with DSM-IV major depression (treatment resistant).

Interventions  After a 2-week drug-free period, subjects were given an intravenous infusion of either ketamine hydrochloride (0.5 mg/kg) or placebo on 2 test days, a week apart. Subjects were rated at baseline and at 40, 80, 110, and 230 minutes and 1, 2, 3, and 7 days postinfusion.

Main Outcome Measure  Changes in scores on the primary efficacy measure, the 21-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale.

Results  Subjects receiving ketamine showed significant improvement in depression compared with subjects receiving placebo within 110 minutes after injection, which remained significant throughout the following week. The effect size for the drug difference was very large (d = 1.46 [95% confidence interval, 0.91-2.01]) after 24 hours and moderate to large (d = 0.68 [95% confidence interval, 0.13-1.23]) after 1 week. Of the 17 subjects treated with ketamine, 71% met response and 29% met remission criteria the day following ketamine infusion. Thirty-five percent of subjects maintained response for at least 1 week.

Read this again: showed significant improvement in depression compared with subjects receiving placebo within 110 minutes after injection, which remained significant throughout the following week.

This is absolutely unheard of.  Yet the paper essentially disappeared.

What is esketamine?  It’s related to ketamine (a veterinary anesthetic and drug of abuse) in exactly the same way that a glove for your left hand is related to a right handed glove.  The two drugs are optical isomers of each other.

What’s so important about the mirror image?  It means that esketamine may well act rather differently than ketamine (the fact that ketamine worked is against this).  The classic example is thalidomide, one optical isomer of which causes horrible malformations (phocomelia) while the other is a sedative used in the treatment of multiple myeloma and leprosy.

If toxic side effects can be avoided, the market is enormous.  It is estimated that 25% of women and 10% of men will have a major depression at some point in their lives.

Initially, Esketamine ( SPRAVATOTM)  will likely be limited to treatment resistant depression.  But depressed people will find a way to get it and  their docs will find a way to give it.  Who wants to wait three weeks.  Just think of the extremely sketchy ‘medical indications’ for marihuana.

 

Stock tip — update

The FDA approved esketamine (Spravato) last week (see copy of original post at the end).  I had recommended buying Johnson and Johnson if the FDA approved it.  I think it’s a good long term buy, but there is no rush for the following reason — Esketamine is not a drug you can get a prescription for and take on you own. Because of the psychiatric side effects it must be administered in a SPRAVATO REMS.

Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS): SPRAVATO™ is available only through a restricted program called the SPRAVATO™ REMS because of the risks of serious adverse outcomes from sedation, dissociation, and abuse and misuse.

Important requirements of the SPRAVATO™ REMS include the following:

  • Healthcare settings must be certified in the program and ensure that SPRAVATO™ is:
    • Only dispensed in healthcare settings and administered to patients who are enrolled in the program.
    • Administered by patients under the direct observation of a healthcare provider and that patients are monitored by a healthcare provider for at least 2 hours after administration of SPRAVATO™.
  • Pharmacies must be certified in the REMS and must only dispense SPRAVATO™ to healthcare settings that are certified in the program.

So you can’t go to some shady practitioner who’ll say you have treatment resistant depression and get some (e.g. the pill pushers for opiates, ‘medical’ marihuana  etc. etc.)

So there aren’t going to be hordes of users right away, although the stuff I’ve read implies that there will be eventually.

If you have a subscription to Cell have a look at vol. 101 pp. 774 – 778 ’19 by the guys at Yale who did some of the original work.  If not content yourself with this.

They are refreshingly honest.

Was the Discovery of Ketamine’s Antidepressant Serendipitous?Of course. However, its discovery emerged from the testing of a novel mechanistic hypothesis related to the pathophysiology of depression.”

Basically the authors rejected the regnant theory of depression, namely that the cause was to be found in monoamine neurotransmission (e.g. by dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin).  There was some evidence that the cerebral cortex was involved in depression (not just the monamine nuclei of the brainstem), so they looked at the two major neurotransmitters in brain (glutamic acid, and GABA), and chose to see what would happen if they blocked one of the many receptors for glutamic acid, the NMDA receptor.  They chose ketamine to do this.
Here’s what they found,  A single dose of ketamine produced antidepressant effects that began within hours peaked in 24 – 72 hours and dissipated within 2 weeks (if ketamine wasn’t repeated).  This was in 50 – 75% people with treatment resistant depression.  Remarkable 1/3 of treated patients went into remission.    There simply has never been anything like this, which is why I thought the drug would be a blockbuster.
There is a lot of speculation about just which effect of esketamine is crucial (increase in glutamic acid release with AMPAR stimulation, brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) release, TrkB receptor stimulation, mTORC1 activation, local protein synthesis, restoration of functional connectivity in functional MRI.   In animals one sees a rapid proliferation of dendritic spines.
As promised – here’s a copy of the first post

Stock tip

The past performance of stock recommendations is no guarantee that it will continue — which is fortunate as my first tip (ONTX) was a disaster.  I knew it was a 10 to one shot but with a 100 to 1 payoff.  People play the lottery with worse odds.  Anyway ONTX had a rationale — for the gory details see — https://luysii.wordpress.com/2016/06/01/in-a-gambling-mood/

For those brave souls who followed this recommendation (including yours truly) here’s another.

On 4 March 2019 if the FDA approves esketamine for depression, buy Johnson and Johnson.  Why?  Some people think that no drug for depression works that well, as big Pharma in the past only was reporting positive studies.  The following is from Nature 21 February 2019.

Depression drug A form of the hallucinogenic party drug ketamine has cleared one of the final hurdles towards clinical use as an antidepressant. During a 12 February meeting at the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in Silver Spring, Maryland,an independent advisory panel voted 14 to 2 in favour of recommending a compound known as esketamine for use in treating depression.

What’s so hot about esketamine?  First its mechanism of action is completely different than the SSRIs, Monoamine oxidase inhibitors, or tricyclic antidepressants.

As you likely know, antidepressants usually take a few weeks to work at least in endogenous depression.  My clinical experience as a neurologist is slightly different, as I only used it for patients with disease I couldn’t help (end stage MS etc. etc.) where the only normal response to the situation was depression.  They often helped patients within a week.

I was staggered when I read the following paper back in the day.  But there was no followup essentially.

archives of general psychiatry volume 63 pp. 856 – 864 2006
The paper is not from St. Fraudulosa Hospital in Plok Tic, but from the Mood Disorders Research Unit at the National Institute of Mental Health.
Here are the basics from the paper

Patients  Eighteen subjects with DSM-IV major depression (treatment resistant).

Interventions  After a 2-week drug-free period, subjects were given an intravenous infusion of either ketamine hydrochloride (0.5 mg/kg) or placebo on 2 test days, a week apart. Subjects were rated at baseline and at 40, 80, 110, and 230 minutes and 1, 2, 3, and 7 days postinfusion.

Main Outcome Measure  Changes in scores on the primary efficacy measure, the 21-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale.

Results  Subjects receiving ketamine showed significant improvement in depression compared with subjects receiving placebo within 110 minutes after injection, which remained significant throughout the following week. The effect size for the drug difference was very large (d = 1.46 [95% confidence interval, 0.91-2.01]) after 24 hours and moderate to large (d = 0.68 [95% confidence interval, 0.13-1.23]) after 1 week. Of the 17 subjects treated with ketamine, 71% met response and 29% met remission criteria the day following ketamine infusion. Thirty-five percent of subjects maintained response for at least 1 week.

Read this again: showed significant improvement in depression compared with subjects receiving placebo within 110 minutes after injection, which remained significant throughout the following week.

This is absolutely unheard of.  Yet the paper essentially disappeared.

What is esketamine?  It’s related to ketamine (a veterinary anesthetic and drug of abuse) in exactly the same way that a glove for your left hand is related to a right handed glove.  The two drugs are optical isomers of each other.

What’s so important about the mirror image?  It means that esketamine may well act rather differently than ketamine (the fact that ketamine worked is against this).  The classic example is thalidomide, one optical isomer of which causes horrible malformations (phocomelia) while the other is a sedative used in the treatment of multiple myeloma and leprosy.

If toxic side effects can be avoided, the market is enormous.  It is estimated that 25% of women and 10% of men will have a major depression at some point in their lives.

Initially, Esketamine ( SPRAVATOTM)  will likely be limited to treatment resistant depression.  But depressed people will find a way to get it and  their docs will find a way to give it.  Who wants to wait three weeks.  Just think of the extremely sketchy ‘medical indications’ for marihuana.

Stock tip

The past performance of stock recommendations is no guarantee that it will continue — which is fortunate as my first tip (ONTX) was a disaster.  I knew it was a 10 to one shot but with a 100 to 1 payoff.  People play the lottery with worse odds.  Anyway ONTX had a rationale — for the gory details see — https://luysii.wordpress.com/2016/06/01/in-a-gambling-mood/

For those brave souls who followed this recommendation (including yours truly) here’s another.

On 4 March 2019 if the FDA approves esketamine for depression, buy Johnson and Johnson.  Why?  Some people think that no drug for depression works that well, as big Pharma in the past only was reporting positive studies.  The following is from Nature 21 February 2019.

Depression drug A form of the hallucinogenic party drug ketamine has cleared one of the final hurdles towards clinical use as an antidepressant. During a 12 February meeting at the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in Silver Spring, Maryland,an independent advisory panel voted 14 to 2 in favour of recommending a compound known as esketamine for use in treating depression.

What’s so hot about esketamine?  First its mechanism of action is completely different than the SSRIs, Monoamine oxidase inhibitors, or tricyclic antidepressants.

As you likely know, antidepressants usually take a few weeks to work at least in endogenous depression.  My clinical experience as a neurologist is slightly different, as I only used it for patients with disease I couldn’t help (end stage MS etc. etc.) where the only normal response to the situation was depression.  They often helped patients within a week.

I was staggered when I read the following paper back in the day.  But there was no followup essentially.

archives of general psychiatry volume 63 pp. 856 – 864 2006
The paper is not from St. Fraudulosa Hospital in Plok Tic, but from the Mood Disorders Research Unit at the National Institute of Mental Health.
Here are the basics from the paper

Patients  Eighteen subjects with DSM-IV major depression (treatment resistant).

Interventions  After a 2-week drug-free period, subjects were given an intravenous infusion of either ketamine hydrochloride (0.5 mg/kg) or placebo on 2 test days, a week apart. Subjects were rated at baseline and at 40, 80, 110, and 230 minutes and 1, 2, 3, and 7 days postinfusion.

Main Outcome Measure  Changes in scores on the primary efficacy measure, the 21-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale.

Results  Subjects receiving ketamine showed significant improvement in depression compared with subjects receiving placebo within 110 minutes after injection, which remained significant throughout the following week. The effect size for the drug difference was very large (d = 1.46 [95% confidence interval, 0.91-2.01]) after 24 hours and moderate to large (d = 0.68 [95% confidence interval, 0.13-1.23]) after 1 week. Of the 17 subjects treated with ketamine, 71% met response and 29% met remission criteria the day following ketamine infusion. Thirty-five percent of subjects maintained response for at least 1 week.

Read this again: showed significant improvement in depression compared with subjects receiving placebo within 110 minutes after injection, which remained significant throughout the following week.

This is absolutely unheard of.  Yet the paper essentially disappeared.

What is esketamine?  It’s related to ketamine (a veterinary anesthetic and drug of abuse) in exactly the same way that a glove for your left hand is related to a right handed glove.  The two drugs are optical isomers of each other.

What’s so important about the mirror image?  It means that esketamine may well act rather differently than ketamine (the fact that ketamine worked is against this).  The classic example is thalidomide, one optical isomer of which causes horrible malformations (phocomelia) while the other is a sedative used in the treatment of multiple myeloma and leprosy.

If toxic side effects can be avoided, the market is enormous.  It is estimated that 25% of women and 10% of men will have a major depression at some point in their lives.

Initially, Esketamine ( SPRAVATOTM)  will likely be limited to treatment resistant depression.  But depressed people will find a way to get it and  their docs will find a way to give it.  Who wants to wait three weeks.  Just think of the extremely sketchy ‘medical indications’ for marihuana.