What is legionella trying to tell us?

10 years out of Med School, a classmate in the Public Health service had to deal with the first recognized outbreak of Legionnaire’s disease, at the Bellevue Stratford hotel in Philly, about one air mile from Penn Med where we went.   The organism wasn’t known at the time and caused 182 cases with 29 deaths.  We’ve learned a lot more about Legionella Pneumophila since 1976 and the organism continues to instruct us.

The most recent lesson concerns one of the 300 or so proteins Legionella injects into a cell it attacks.  This is remarkable in itself.  The organism uses them to hijack various cellular mechanisms to build a home for itself in the cell (the LCV — Legionella Containing Vacuole).  Contrast this with diphtheria which basically uses one protein (diphtheria toxin) to kill the cell.

One of the 300 proteins is called SidJ and looks like a protein kinase (of which our genome has over 500).  However [ Science vol. 364 pp. 787 – 792 ’19 ] shows that SidJ carries out a different different reaction.SidJ is activated by host-cell calmodulin to polyglutamylate the SidE family of ubiquitin (Ub) ligases inhibiting them. Crystal structures of the SidJ-calmodulin complex reveal a protein kinase fold that catalyzes ATP-dependent isopeptide bond formation between the amino group of free glutamate and the gamma carboxyl group in the catalytic center of SidE a ubiquitin ligase.   This, instead of just esterifying the hydroxyl group of serine or threonine or tyrosine with the terminal phosphate of ATP as a kinase is supposed to do.

Why is this important? The only protein known to have polyglutamic acid added to it is tubulin, the protein from which microtubules (neurotubules to the neurologist).  The work is important because some of the 500+ protein kinases in our genome might be doing something else.  Has the chemistry each and every member of the group been studied?  Probably not..

The authors close with “In summary, our results underscore the diversity and catalytic versatility of the protein kinase superfamily. We propose that ATP-dependent ligation reactions may be a common feature among the vast diversity of eukaryotic protein kinase–like enzymes found in nature (25). There are more than 500 protein kinases in humans and our results suggest that they should be ex- amined for alternative activities.”

I couldn’t agree more.

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