We don’t understand amyloid very well

I must admit I was feeling pretty snarky about our understanding of amyloid and Alzheimer’s after the structure of Abeta42 was published.  In particular the structure explained why the alanine 42–> threonine 42 mutation was protective against Alzheimer’s disease while the alanine 42 –> valine 42 mutation increases the risk.  That’s all explained in the last post — https://luysii.wordpress.com/2017/10/12/abeta42-at-last/ — but a copy will appear at the end.

In that post I breathlessly hoped for the structure of aBeta40 which is known to be less toxic to neurons.  Well it’s here and it shows how little we understand about what does and what doesn’t form amyloid.  The structure appears in a paper about the amyloid formed by another protein (FUS) to be described later — Cell 171, 615–627, October 19, 2017 — figure 7 p. 624.

Now all Abeta40 lacks are the last 2 amino acids of Abeta42 — isoleucine at 41 and alanine at 42.  So solve the Schrodinger equation for it, and stack it up so it forms amyloid, or use your favorite molecular dynamics or other modeling tool.  Take a guess what it looks like.

Abeta42 is a dimer, a beta40 is a trimer, even though the first 40 amino acids of both are identical.

It gets worse. FUS (FUsed in Sarcoma) is a 526 amino acid protein which binds to RNA and is mostly found in the nucleus.  Neurologists are interested in it because over 50 mutations in have been found in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD).   FUS contains a low complexity domain (LCD) of 214 amino acids, 80% of which are one of 4 amino acids (glycine, serine, glutamine and tyrosine).  At high protein concentrations this domain of FUS forms long unbundled fibrils with the characteristic crossBeta structure of amyloid.  Only 57/214 of the LCD amino acids are part of the structured core of the amyloid — the rest are disordered.

Even worse the amino acids forming the amyloid core (#39 -#95) are NOT predicted by a variety of computational methods predicting amyloid formation (Agrescan, FISH, FOLDamyloid, Metamyl, PASTA 2.0).  The percentages of gly, ser, gln and tyr in the core forming region are pretty much the same as in the whole protein.  The core forming region has no repeats longer than 4 amino acids.

The same figure 7 has the structure of the amyloid formed by alpha-synuclein, which accumulates in the Lewy bodies of Parkinson’s disease.  It just has one peptide per layer of amyloid.

When you really understand something you can predict things, not just describe them as they are revealed.

 

Abeta42 at last

It’s easy to see why cryoEM got the latest chemistry Nobel.  It is telling us so much.  Particularly fascinating to me as a retired neurologist is the structure of the Abeta42 fibril reported in last Friday’s Science (vol. 358 pp. 116 – 119 ’17).

Caveats first.  The materials were prepared using an aqueous solution at low pH containing an organic cosolvent — so how physiologic could the structure actually be?  It probably is physiologic as the neurotoxicity of the fibrils to neurons in culture was the same as fibrils grown at neutral pH.  This still isn’t the same as fibrils grown in the messy concentrated chemical soup known as the cytoplasm.  Tending to confirm their findings is the fact that NMR and Xray diffraction on the crystals produced the same result.

The fibrils were unbranched and microns long (implying at least 2,000 layers of the beta sheets to be described).  The beta sheets stack in parallel and in register giving the classic crossBeta sheet structure.  They were made of two protofilaments winding around each other.  Each protofilament contains all 42 amino acids of Abeta42 and all of them form a completely flat beta sheet structure.

Feast your eyes on figure 2 p. 117.  In addition to showing the two beta sheets of the two protofilaments, it shows how they bind to each other.  Aspartic acid #1 of one sheet binds to lysine #28 of the other.  Otherwise the interface is quite hydrophobic.  Alanine2 of one sheet binds to alanine42 of the other, valine39 of one sheet binds to valine 39 of the other.  Most importantly isoLeucine 41 of one sheet binds to glycine38 of the other.

This is important since the difference between the less toxic Abeta40 and the toxic Abeta 42 are two hydrophobic amino acids Isoleucine 41 and Alanine 42.  This makes for a tighter, longer, more hydrophobic interface between the protofilaments stabilizing them.

That’s just a guess.  I can’t wait for work on Abeta40 to be reported at this resolution.

A few other points.  The beta sheet of each protomer is quite planar, but the planes of the two protomers are tilted by 10 degrees accounting for the helicity of the fibril. The fibril is a rhombus whose longest edge is about 70 Angstroms.

Even better the structure explains a mutation which is protective against Alzheimer’s.  This remains the strongest evidence (to me at least) that Abeta peptides are significantly involved in Alzheimer’s disease, therapeutic failures based on this idea notwithstanding.  The mutation is a change of alanine2 to threonine which can’t possibly snuggle up hydrophobically to isoleucine nearly as well as alanine did. This should significantly weaken the link between the two protofilaments and make fibril formation more difficult.

The Abeta structure of the paper also explains another mutation. This one increases the risk of Alzheimer’s disease (like many others which have been discovered).  It involves the same amino acid (alanine2) but this time it is changed to the morehydrophobic valine, probably resulting in a stronger hydrophobic interaction with isoLeucine41 (assuming that valine’s greater bulk doesn’t get in the way sterically).

Wonderful stuff to think and speculate about, now that we actually have some solid data to chew on.

Advertisements
Post a comment or leave a trackback: Trackback URL.

Comments

  • Ed Gehrman  On October 26, 2017 at 11:50 pm

    The PROBLEM with most Government and University informational websites is that no attempt is made to critique the research reports, making it impossible for others to understand the significance of these data. There is much controversy regarding the causality of TSEs. Our research shows that prion amyloid (the TSE research focus for the past 30 years) is the result of a bacterial infection. This controversy directly reflects on Louis Pasteur’s efforts to prove that replicating crystals are not the cause of infectious disease, but instead bacteria are the culprits. Too bad we have to rehash this controversy.
    Dr. Frank Bastian
    More at tseresearchcenter.org

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: