An uplifting way to start the New Year

This not a scientific post. Going to a memorial service for an old friend hardly seems like an uplifting way to begin the new year. And yet it was. David and I had been friends since ’58 when we were in the same eating club. He also became an M. D. and unfortunately passed away of a slowly dementing illness, probably Alzheimer’s. As a neurologist I could do nothing for him. What little I did accomplish was discussing the scientific aspects with with his wife, explaining the latest breakthroughs she’d read about (which never were). She was a rock, standing by him until the end. Having taken care of many such patients, and having an uncle die of it, I know just how hard this is.

What in the world could be uplifting about something like this? Seeing how David’s intelligence and personality has now marched on through 4 children and (at least) 4 grandchildren. So in a way he really isn’t gone. What was uncanny was seeing David’s eyes staring at me out of his oldest daughter. It really is remarkable, given what we think we know about genetics, and that 10,000 or so of our 20,000 protein coding genes come from one parent, that an offspring will resemble just one parent and not be an amalgam of both. Perhaps just a few genes determine what we look like.

The grandchildren I talked to ranged in age from about 8 to 17. All were smart and articulate. I tried to push them to use their obvious brains to go into research and perhaps prevent or treat what happened to their grandfather. The littlest one said that he was going to be a particle physicist.

I don’t remember talking religion with David or anyone else back in college. There were devout members of the club who would march in glowing after Sunday church, only to be treated by hungover club mates to a chorus of “Onward Christian Soldiers”. One classmate did become the Lutheran Bishop of Western New York, but he certainly didn’t push his religiosity. The most religious one I do remember became a physics professor at Berkeley.

Of course there were remembrances, that of his oldest daughter being the most interesting (to me). She is a religious Christian who clearly loved her father very much, even though he was a professed atheist, although with a strong sense of right and wrong. They used to argue about the existence or nonexistence of God. She and I agreed that he would never do anything that he thought was wrong, probably one of the reasons I liked him (remember the hungover reprobates of a few paragraphs ago). I suppose his daughter now has the last word, but such an argument really has no end.

It was pretty hard to be a doc back in the 60s and 70s watching good people suffer and die, and still conceive of a benevolent creator. “The Plague” by Camus with its hideous death scene of a child pretty much sums up the argument against one.

And yet, now that we know so much more molecular biology, cellular and organismal biochemistry and physiology, our existence seems totally miraculous. I at least have achieved a sense of peace about illness, suffering and death. These things seem natural. What is truly miraculous is that we are well and functional for so long.

You can take or leave the argument from design of Reverend Paley — here it is

“”In crossing a heath, suppose I pitched my foot against a stone, and were asked how the stone came to be there; I might possibly answer, that, for anything I knew to the contrary, it had lain there forever: nor would it perhaps be very easy to show the absurdity of this answer. But suppose I had found a watch upon the ground, and it should be inquired how the watch happened to be in that place; I should hardly think of the answer I had before given, that for anything I knew, the watch might have always been there. … There must have existed, at some time, and at some place or other, an artificer or artificers, who formed [the watch] for the purpose which we find it actually to answer; who comprehended its construction, and designed its use. … Every indication of contrivance, every manifestation of design, which existed in the watch, exists in the works of nature; with the difference, on the side of nature, of being greater or more, and that in a degree which exceeds all computation.”

The more chemistry and biochemistry I know about what’s going on inside us, the harder I find it to accept that this arose by chance.

This does not make me an anti-evoloutionist. One of the best arguments for evolution, is the evidence for descent with modification, one of its major tenets. The fact that we can use one of our proteins to replace one on yeast using our present genetic technology is hard to explain any other way.

Actually to me now, the existence or nonexistence of a creator is irrelevant. The facts of how we are built is not something you need faith about. The awe about it all comes naturally the more we know and the more we find out.

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Comments

  • Imaging guy  On January 11, 2016 at 9:21 am

    ” It really is remarkable, given what we think we know about genetics, and that 10,000 or so of our 20,000 protein coding genes come from one parent,….”

    It is my understanding that there are 20, 000 or so protein coding genes on the 23 chromosomes we receive from each parent and both alleles are usually expressed unless there is genetic imprinting which I believe to be rare in mammals.

  • luysii  On January 11, 2016 at 10:31 am

    imaging Guy — Thanks — very poorly expressed on my part. If you think of each protein coding gene having only two alleles one of which is dominant and one of which is recessive and both occurring at a frequency of 50%, then we should get 10,000 dominant genes from one parent and 10,000 from the other, leading us to become an amalgam of dominant genes from both.

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