When the active form of a protein is intrinsically disordered

Back in the day, biochemists talked about the shape of a protein, influenced by the spectacular pictures produced by Xray crystallography. Now, of course, we know that a protein has multiple conformations in the cell. I still find it miraculous that the proteins making us up have only relatively few. For details see — https://luysii.wordpress.com/2010/08/04/why-should-a-protein-have-just-one-shape-or-any-shape-for-that-matter/.

Presently, we also know that many proteins contain segments which are intrinsically disordered (e.g. no single shape).The pendulum has swung the other way — “estimations that contiguous regions longer than 50 amino acids ‘may be present” in ‘up to’ 50% of proteins coded in eukaryotic genomes [ Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. vol. 102 pp. 17002 – 17007 ’05 ]

[ Science vol. 325 pp. 1635 – 1636 ’09 ] Compared to ordered regions, disordered regions of proteins have evolved rapidly, contain many short linear motifs that mediate protein/protein interactions, and have numerous phosphorylation sites compared to ordered regions. Disordered regions are enriched in serine and threonine residues, while ordered sequences are enriched in tyrosines — this highlights functional differences in the types of phosphorylation. Interestingly tyrosines have been lost during evolution.

What are unstructured protein segments good for? One theory is that the disordered segment can adopt different conformations to bind to different partners — this is the moonlighting effect. Then there is the fly casting mechanism — by being disordered (hence extended rather than compact) such proteins can flail about and find partners more easily.

Given what we know about enzyme function (and by inference protein function), it is logical to assume that the structured form of a protein which can be unstructured is the functional form.

Not so according to this recent example [ Nature vol. 519 pp. 106 – 109 ’15 ]. 4EBP2 is a protein involved in the control of protein synthesis. It binds to another protein also involved in synthesis (eIF4E) to suppress a form of translation of mRNA into protein (cap dependent translation if you must know). 4EBP2 is intrinsically disordered. When it binds to its target it undergoes a disorder to ordered transition. However eIF4E binding only occurs from the intrinsically disordered form.

Control of 4EBP2 activity is due, in part, to phosphorylation on multiple sites. This induces folding of amino acids #18 – #62 into a 4 stranded beta domain which sequesters the canonical YXXXLphi motif with which 4EBP2 binds eIF4E (Y stands for tyrosine, X for any amino acid, L for leucine and phi for any bulky hydrophobic amino acid). So here we have an inactive (e.g. nonbonding) form of a protein being the structured rather than the unstructured form. The unstructured form of 4EBP2 is therefore the physiologically active form of the protein.

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